Are there really two versions of “Find The Cost Of Freedom” on this version?

**

This insert was used by WCF and Contraband. Both bootleggers used almost identical numbers. The Contraband release comes (at least) with pirate or blank labels (shown below):

** back to WCF:

USA: 1971

Source: Second show at the L.A. Forum, 26 June 1970. Part of this show was released on the official live album 4 Way Street

This material had appeared first on this 1970 Rubber Dubber release:

It took CSNY and Atlantic Records nine months to compile and finish a live album from the shows they had recorded in June and early July of 1970. I bet Rubber Dubber’s much faster to market release did cause some ripples. Rolling Stone specifically mentioned it in a October 14th 1971 article titled “Feds Are Leaning On Bootleggers”: “CSN&Y’s 4 Way Street followed on the heels of a highly successful bootleg, which many argue was of better quality than the company released product.”

HOTWACKS were a bit sloppy when listing the different versions. Rubber Dubber’s has no quality rating but the CBM copy is rated ‘Vgm’ without any reference to it being a copy of the former. WCF’s version was not listed. I do believe that WCF’s copy came before CBM’s.

***

Other versions:

  • LID Records, which may also have been a WCF product:

  • the ABSTRACT RECORDS version:

  • the Japan JL series copy JL 506 with a printed cover:

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USA: 1971

Side 1 matrix: <– RP 24-A –>

It appears that for the Beatles side two different versions may exist: 24 X X may play the 1965 Ed Sullivan show as listed on the label. RP-24-B does play five songs from their 1965 Shea Stadium soundtrack instead: Twist And Shout / I Feel Fine / Dizzy Miss Lizzy / Ticket To Ride

It appears that a mistake was made and the RP-24-B version came first after the art work and label for the six Ed Sullivan tracks had already been printed, causing a discrepancy.

On the Rolling Stones side, the track list contains many mistakes. Track 1 is “Looking Tired” from the 6 September 1965 RCA Studio Hollywood sessions an four tracks from their Chess Studio Chicago session, 11 June 1964: Tell Me Baby / Down In The Bottom / Stewed And Keefed / Hi-Heel Sneakers

The quality is excellent. Most collectors know this material from TMOQ’s Bright Lights Big City album, which was still years away at this time (released: July 1973).

***

This title was copied as part of Japan’s ‘JL’ series around 1976-7 as JL 512:

The font used for the numbers, side markers and running time give this away as a WCF copy.

The handwritten matrix

USA: 1971

The original version of GET BACK TO TORONTO were taken from an acetate compiled by Glyn Johns in late January 1969 (compilation 1) which was only meant to give everyone involved a chance to hear what some of the songs would sound on record; it was not meant to be mock up for a future release. This same source was used for the very first beatleg KUM BACK and Get Back (Lemon Records). These songs were broadcast on radio station WBCN in Boston on 22 September ’69.

“NOTE: it hasn’t been determined if all the early releases are sourced from the same original tape of the broadcast. Due to the amount of releases which featured this material in the early 1970s, it seems possible that other folks might have recorded the broadcast. It could even be possible that some of the early bootlegs might source from WBCN’s tape or the original tape of the acetate.” [source, see link below]

http://www.beatlesource.com/bs/mains/audio/GetBack/comp1/kumback.html

Track list, using info from the above link:

Side A:

“Peace message” – Likely recorded in Canada after December 15th, where John & Yoko unveiled their War Is Over If You Want It campaign plus plans for a big festival around the July 4th weekend in Mosport, Canada. John & Yoko proclaim 1970 as “year one” – quite a start for a Beatles bootleg.

Get Back
This is the only place to hear this performance and mix of this song and the snippets of “I’ve Got A Feeling” and “Help” which follow it.

Teddy Boy
This mix adds an additional 1:16 of performance between the breakdown at the beginning and the start of the song. which is not heard on compilations 2 and 3.

Two Of Us
This mix includes a snippet of another performance [24.48] (probably a remnant of an earlier, discarded mix) and a false start not heard on compilations 2, 3 or 4.

Dig A Pony
Strangely, although this is a different mix, it features the tape-start sound heard at the beginning which is heard on compilations 2 and 3 but not on compilation 4.

I’ve Got A Feeling
This mix includes an additional :10 extended ending after John’s comment “Not bad though” not heard on compilations 2, 3 or 4.

SIDE TWO

The Long And Winding Road (not included)

Let It Be
This begins with what is probably a remnant of an earlier, discarded mix. None of this performance or mix appear anywhere else.

Don’t Let Me Down
With the exception of John’s comment about “give me the courage to come screaming in” being a bit more clear, this mix features nothing not heard on compilations 2, 3 or 4.

For You Blue
This mix features a five second longer outro which includes guitar chop not heard on compilations 2, 3 or 4.

Get Back
This performance would form the basis of both the single and Let It Be album versions. The performance, itself, appears on all versions. The spoken intro is heard on compilation 2 and the Let It Be album. The post-song dialog is extended on compilation 2. The single version, which also appears on compilations 3 and 4, omits the spoken intro and adds a coda (taken from another performance) to the end, eliminating the post-song bits.

The Walk
This is the only place to hear this performance and mix of this song.

“Christmas Message” is a copy of the 1967 fan club flexi best known for the improvisation “Christmas Time Is here Again”. I guess this was included as out of all their Christmas recordings it comes closest to an actual (beginning of a) song or outtake.

 

***

Tracing the different versions of the GET BACK TO TORONTO album is not easy, as there are so many. Starting with the stamped covers, we have the following:

  • A HA HA / B HO HO
  • IPF .1 A / IPF. 1 B
  • IPF-1-A S-2142 / IPF-1-B S-2143
  • LOEB side 1 / LOEB side 2

 

First released early 1970.

**

Then there are the versions with the blue ‘peace sign’ cover:

Like the stamped cover version, they can be found with I.P.F. 1A / I.P.F. 1B and IPF-1-A ST S-2142 / IPF-1-B S-2143

I believe it’s this reissue of the original I.P.F. release that was copied by WCF (and Contraband – folded down to mono).

 

(I was not able to find a good quality image where CBM copied their round logo right onto the I.P.F. design.)

Matrix: 3519 A/B or WEC-3519 A/B

***

If you have any further details, please leave a comment.

 

Beatles LIB - LIVE

Beatles LIB - LIVE b&amp;w

 

 

Matrix: LB11-a / LB11-b

The insert is usually found in black & white, green or red. It also exists with blank white labels.

To be distinguished from the later Japan copy JL 1006(LB-1) with matrix ‘LB 11’:

 

USA: ca. 1970

WCF’s version was listed in HOTWACKS all these years but the rare original beatlegs this material was copied from passed under HW’s radar.

According to the beatlesource website, the second ever ‘beatleg’ (after Kum Back! ) was a now extremely rare album called O.P.D.. It presented the 2nd Glyn Johns compilation culled from the dozens of multi-track tapes recorded during the part of the Get Back sessions held at Savile Row and a first real attempt to shape the material into a commercial release.

This 2nd Glyn Johns compilation ended up being played on US radio station WKBW in Buffalo, NY from a reel to reel tape on September 20th, 1969 (the details as researched by John Winn, can be found in a series of articles starting with this installment). However, it appears that the two bootlegs now described in detail were not the result of someone taping the WKBW broadcast.

More details can be found here: http://www.beatlesource.com/bs/mains/audio/GetBack/gb2intro.html

 

O.P.D. 2

A: The 2nd Beatles bootleg containing the 2nd Get Back compilation; released January 1970 on the West Coast. Matrix: OW LIPSON A 12958 / OW LIPSON B

 

SIDE ONE

1. One After 909
2. Rocker-Save The Last Dance For Me-Don’t Let Me Down
3. Don’t Let Me Down
4. Dig A Pony
5. I’ve Got A Feeling
6. Get Back

SIDE TWO

1. For You Blue
2. Teddy Boy
3. Two Of Us-Maggie Mae
4. Dig It
5. Let It Be
6. Long and Winding Road
7. Get Back (Reprise)

This compilation contained two unique song differences that were preserved thanks to the bootlegs:

  • “Get Back” is the same take as the 45 version but without the coda and we can hear the song ending as it did in the studio plus we get to hear a few precious seconds of sounds and chat never included on any other source or version
  • “Dig It” is presented here in a unique edit lasting 4:57, a full minute more than on the more common third Glyn Johns compilation.

O.P.D.

O.P.D. b

 

***

B: That same month on the East coast saw the release of the third beatleg: The “Silver Album”.

SAotWG 1

Matrix: JARRIS 0020 A/B

SAotWG matrix

C: Other/subsequent editions included first a full-size blank white label and then a printed label stating what appeared to be the album’s title.

SAotWG 1 pr lbl

The printed label version was likely already a copy produced by someone else. It replaced the official version of “Don’t Let Me Down” and “Two Of Us” with the versions from the first beatleg, Kum Back! – which was based on Glyn Johns 1st compilation, which used a unique version of the latter track not heard on compilations 2 to 4.

D: A final cover variation used blank white covers this time and the word “SILVER” stamped on:

SAotWG st

It appears that at this stage the insert appeared. The matrix for this version shown here was still JARRIS 0020 A/B

E: The insert combined with a silver or grey sleeve

Beatles LIB - LIVE grey 2

Beatles LIB - LIVE grey

**

While LET IT BE LIVE used the same source tape as O.P.D., there were significant differences:

  • a number of tracks included on O.P.D. were left off
  • a higher tape generation had been used
  • “Don’t let Me Down” and “Get Back”on side 1 had been replaced by the official 45 versions
  • “Across The Universe” from an airing of the Nothing’s Gonna Change Our World WWF album version (just released in the UK on 12 December 1969) was tacked on at the end of side 2

 

SIDE ONE
1. Don’t Let Me Down (3:31) – single B-side
2. Dig A Pony (3:51)
3. Get Back (3:09) – single A-side
4. For You Blue (2:30)                                                                                                                                       5. Two Of Us (3:18) 

SIDE TWO

1. Dig It (5:02)
2. Let It Be (3:59)
3. The Long and Winding Road (3:43)
4. One After 909 (2:43)
5. Across The Universe (3:17) – from WWF LP

 

***

F: The WCF version with the printed labels shown at the start should be placed here. “Silver Greatest” then serves no other purpose than to point out that WCF had copied this album from someone else (since bootlegs were sold shrink-wrapped and the labels could not be used as a means of sales, pointing out to potential sellers that this was another version of the famous “Silver Album” they might have heard about). This also does not appear to be a reference that the band used be known as the Silver Beatles at one time.

 

G. Around 1974, WCF reissued this album with inserts printed in much brighter colors and in a (sometimes recycled) fold out sleeve using blank white labels:

Beatles LIB - LIVE RE gr

Beatles LIB - LIVE RE red

The matrix is now LB 11-A x  /  LB 11 B x    (these ‘added x’ matrices seem to have indicated a reprinted title)

I have found two auctions that state that the fold out sleeve was created by reversing a Berkeley 1974 Dylan printed cover of Dylan and the Band Return (# 2039/40). Here is a photo of what lurks behind the cover of the red insert copy shown above:

First stamp (I am not sure which came first at this point):

Band Live Band

Band Live Band stencil

Band Live Band S-937 d 1

Band Live Band S-937 d 2

 

2nd stamp:

Band Live Band v 3

 

3rd stamp:

Band Live Band red st 2

 

plus slip sheet:

Band Live B # One

I have only seen this with a red insert.

Plus with the WCF-typical title label:

Band Live Band # One ins

 

 

USA, California, ca. 1970

Matrix: LS-1 or: Microgroove / A Jeff Charles Production LS-1 or: Contraband LS1

I am not sure if this was the first release WCF ever did but it must have been one of the first. HOTWACKS alluded that this was from their famous Hollywood Bowl performance in July of 1970 by way of the CBM title/clone What’Cha want Mama! (see below) but this was recorded in Pasadena, CA, probably at the Civic Auditorium in July of 1969.

About the recording – notes by Doinker:

“The Band – Mega-rare restored vinyl “Live Band” Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena CA 1969

This is a great show! But hey…

Let’s get one thing straight here: The recording isn’t as bad as everyone makes it out to be. For one thing, the moment the tape starts you know you’re listening to a good recording rig. This wasn’t recorded with cheap equipment, and it shows. It isn’t distorted, just a bit distant. Also the pressing (in this case a first pressing) is almost immaculate and runs very quiet. Correcting the speed slightly has also helped quite a bit. Believe me, you’ve heard far worse.

The performance is simply great. And, that’s where it counts.”

Setlist (Runtime about 40 minutes 36 seconds):

This Wheel’s On Fire
Baby, Don’t You Do It
I Shall Be Released
King Harvest (Has Surely Come)
Don’t You Tell Henry
Rockin’ Chair
Organ Solo
Chest Fever
Jemima Surrender
Slippin’And Slidin’

 

CBM on the East Coast also released this recording under the following title:

 

Band What'cha Want Mama!

Band What'cha Want Mama! 2

Band What'cha Want Mama! 3

Also a very early Contraband title, one of only a handful of stamped titles they did.

I will stick my neck out and bet that this pressing sounds worse than the one done by WCF and that WCF’s came first.

Does the matrix “Contraband LS1” mentioned above, which I got from the http://theband.hiof.no/albums/bootlegs.html really come from a WCF copy and it was just a coincidence? I have never found a matrix # for the CBM release).

 

WCF got its start in 1970 on the west coast and became very active in 1971. They did not give themselves a name until a couple years later when they chose Berkeley Records but it is not hard to identify a WCF title.

This is an attempt at classifying the earliest WCF titles based on matrix numbers, labels and slip sheet characteristics and is a work. A large number of these early WCF titles are quite scarce and must not have been pressed in large numbers as WCF was busy churning out release after release. Some of these were repressed around 1974 in fold-out covers that had a picture of the artist on the back panel.

Each title will be presented in detail. While many were “copy jobs” this series will help determine exactly how many.

If you have any further information, please leave a comment.

***

Part 1: Single ‘non-fold-out’ covers

a. stamped covers

LS-1  THE BAND – LIVE BAND # ONE (+ insert, later issues?)
(NRV-6  CHICAGO – THE WINDY CITY NOVEMBER 26 1970) – previously shown here

103  BOB DYLAN – MOTORCYCLE (released in 1971)

 

b. “Stereo/Compatible For Stereo” (+/or Customized Labels) Series

Labels were produced in a number of bright colors with silver writing, often using a title that related to the artist in some direct or indirect way. This led to the editors of the HOTWACKS book to christen the label with the ill-fitting name “White Cover Folks”; they were obviously not the only ones using blank white covers at this time and in fact were the first label to produce a b&w printed one. The slip sheets followed a similar color scheme.

LB-1  BEATLES – LET IT BE LIVE

KUM BACK #1 – WCF  BEATLES – KUM BACK!
23  BEATLES – GET BACK TO TORONTO
24  BEATLES & ROLLING STONES – BATTLE (RP pre-fix for # 23 + 24)
25/26  CSNY – LIVE AT L.A. FORUM 2 LP  (rec. 26 June ’70)
27  THE WHO – UNRELEASED

30/31   LED ZEPPELIN – BLUEBERRY HILL 2 LP                                                                   32/33  ROLLING STONES – EUROPEAN TOUR – 1970 – LIVE  (rec. 7 October 1970)
34/35  THE BAND – LIVE IN CALIFORNIA # 2   (rec. 10 July ’70)
36  SLY & THE FAMILY STONE – GREATEST HITS LIVE  (rec.  September 1970)
37 (39)  BOB DYLAN – STEALIN’ / JIMI HENDRIX – HENDRIX LIVE HAWAII  Hen 37
38  MOODY BLUES – LIVE ON A TUESDAY AFTERNOON  (rec. Dec. 1970, US Tour)
40/41  BOB DYLAN – GREAT WHITE WONDER 2 LP

ROLLING STONES – GIMME SHELTER

101  BEATLES – LAST LIVE SHOW
102  ROLLING STONES – STONED – M.S.G. / BEATLES – YELLOW MATTER CUSTARD Yellow Rec. 101 / 102
103  BOB DYLAN – MOTORCYCLE
104  V.A. – FILLMORE EAST FINAL CONCERT

111  BOB DYLAN – BLIND BOY GRUNT

 

c. 500 series

501  ELTON JOHN – SUPER STAR – LIVE  / BEATLES – Last Live Show  Live Rec. 501
502  BYRDS – LIVE AT BUDDY’S IN ENGLAND
503/504  BOB DYLAN – THE VILLAGER 2 LP
505  ELTON JOHN – GULLIVER’S GONE
506  CSNY – OHIO
507  BOB DYLAN – KINDEST CUT

509  BOB DYLAN – JOHN BIRCH / ISLE OF WIGHT  Isle label 509
510  BEATLES – WHISKEY FLAT

 

d. 700 series

713  JANIS JOPLIN – WICKED WOMAN
CC-714  CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL – LIVE AT THE FILLMORE EAST
DD-715  DONOVAN – LIVE AT THE REEDY RIVER JUNCTION

717  ROLLING STONES – STONED AGAIN
718  PROCOL HARUM – THE ELUSIVE PROCOL HARUM
719  KINKS – RARE
720  YARDBIRDS – ON DOWN

 

723  JIMI HENDRIX – GOODBYE JIMI
724  LEON RUSSELL – THE MASTER OF SPACE AND TIME 
725  LEON RUSSELL – LIVE AT ANAHEIM CALIF  /  725  BEATLES – RENAISSANCE MINSTRELS
726  BEATLES – RENAISSANCE MINSTRELS 2
727  CAT STEVENS – CATNIP
728  BEATLES – RENAISSANCE MINSTRELS 2

730  LEON RUSSELL – Recorded Live From An Earlier Broadcast
731/732  CSNY – I’m Happy That Y’all Came Down 2 LP’s
731  NEIL YOUNG – Live on Sugar Mountain 1
732  NEIL YOUNG – Live on Sugar Mountain 2 or Live on Sugar Mountain February 1, 1971
734/735  JAMES TAYLOR – Tailor Made
736  THE WHO – INSTANT PARTY
737  EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER – 21st Century Schizoid Rock
738  V.A. – Woodstock Nation
739  GRATEFUL DEAD – Live Dead Spring Tour 1971
740/1  JANIS JOPLIN – GET IT WHILE YOU CAN 2 LP

743  GRATEFUL DEAD – Ain’t It Crazy
744  BOB DYLAN – Looking Back 1
745  BOB DYLAN – Looking Back 2

750  JEFFERSON AIRPLANE

 

e. 4-digit series

1010 NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE – s/t

3304 V.A. – FILLMORE EAST LAST FINAL CONCERT   (re. 27 June 1971)

4011  ROLLING STONES – BEAUTIFUL DELILAH
4022  V.A. – BANGLA DESH
4033  JAMES TAYLOR – NOVEMBER ’72
4042  HARRISON / DYLAN – BANGLA DESH
4044  JAMES TAYLOR – LIVE NEW YORK – NOV. 1972
4045  ROLLING STONES – LIVER THAN YOU’LL EVER BE
4046  SANTANA – LIVE
4047  SANTANA – COLLECTOR’S ITEM

 

f. Miscellaneous

Beatles – Live from Germany 1
CSNY  – Wooden Nickel  ?? XYZ 123 / Dittolino matrix ?
CSNY – Lid??
Bob Dylan – Looking Back 2 blank white / Down Home
Bob Dylan – Million Dollar Bash
Jimi Hendrix – Live at the Forum – Munia 28
Jimi Hendrix Experience – Munia 707 foc!!
J. Geils Band – Live from Germany  Geils 777?
Paul Simon – Solo
Youngbloods – Youngbloods Hit The Live Trail  Blood Records                                         31 W-A/B HM-PART – 1/2  BOB DYLAN – ISLE OF WIGHT (add. matrix; ‘BEAVER REC. 104701/2’ ‘MOTION’)

 

 

 

A. The Melvin Records Discography

 

Their Greatest Unreleased   MM01 1975

21   MM02 1975

Wings Over Atlanta   MM03   1977

When It Says Beatles Beatles Beatles On The Label Label Label You Will Love It On Your Turntable Turntable Turntable   MM04   1978

Ed’s Really Big Beatle Blasts    MM05   1978

The New 21    MM06   1978

(The Move) Omnibus   MM07   1978

Beatles vs Don Ho / Silver Lining    MM08   1979

(John Lennon) Come Back Johnny!   MM09   1979

Visit To Minneapolis EP    MMEP-01   1979

(Ringo Starr) Down And Out?    MS10   1980

Shout/I Forgot To Remember To Forget You 45    MM6-2/MM6-3   1980

Top Of The Pops EP    Brown Cloud Records   year?

John Paul George Ringo In The 1970s    MR-12-S   1980

The 1964 & 1965 Ed Sullivan Shows    MR-14-M   1980

 

2. Supposedly Planned But never Released Melvin Titles

The 1995 book BLACK MARKET BEATLES lists these for 1981 and 1982 but offer no further information. I have my doubts this is more than just an insider joke, I mean The Beatles Order Lunch, seriously?

It does appear that for whatever reason, Melvin Records either decided to cease operations in late 1980 or 1981 or that decision was made for them.

Howdy Y’all    MM-15-UNREL

The Beatles Order Lunch    MM-17-UNREL

Live Somewhere    MS-18-UNREL

Abbey Road under Construction    MM-19-UNREL

The Best Of Melvin    MM-21-UNREL

 

3. Not Melvin Records

Apart from Silver Lining, which technically is not a Melvin Records original release, there is of course this imposter:

Wings Over Wembley

A Melvin release with simple POD labels (a label associated with several re-pressings from the old TMOQ catalog)? Clearly not possible.

***

Around 1985, someone revived the name Overdone Productions for this Beatles bootleg 12″ on colored PVC, I don’t think Eddie or Fred were involved.

 

 

4. The Ballad Of Fred & Yoko

 

“[Fred] went to see George Harrison live in Atlanta, attended both of John Lennon’s “One to One” benefit concerts in New York City, and along with a few other fortunate super-fans, talked his way into spending two weeks in 1974 as a fly-on-the-wall in Nashville, while Paul McCartney recorded a never-released Wings album called “ColdCuts.” As Arnold later told an interviewer, “I was aggressive enough to be at the right places at the right time, that’s all.”

Friends recall Arnold disappearing for weeks at a time, and returning with deliberately vague stories suggesting he’d spent time with John and Yoko in New York. As a local fan club president, he’d get offered occasional promotional opportunities, and meeting the band was apparently part of the deal. “John, you just feel in the atmosphere around you that he’s greater than you are,” Arnold told a reporter about his first visit with Lennon. “He doesn’t necessarily feel that way — you just feel that way.” And Ono? “Yoko,” he hesitated, “I just feel comfortable with. She’s very natural, normal, intelligent and intellectual. A bright lady; very bright.”

In the aftermath of the band’s break-up and Lennon’s death, Arnold had discovered the great cause of his life: “My eventual goal is to one day open a Beatles museum in New York and take people on tours,” he told a reporter, who identified him as the “world’s 2nd largest collector of Beatle paraphernalia.” “Of course I could never sell or part with all my souvenirs and memorabilia,” he told her, “but I’d love to talk to people as I have talked to you.”

In the ’80s, Fred renamed his store The Prism and began increasingly to embrace the avant-garde. Friends wondered openly if Yoko Ono’s influence might be to blame. Fennell and the rest of the city’s old-school Beatles-fan community found his interest in Ono baffling, almost treasonous. “He was much more enamored with Yoko than with Lennon,” Fennell told me, still shuddering at the thought. “We found it very weird.”

Melvin Rec Fred A r s

The Prism became an important meeting place for Charleston’s emerging punk community, and Arnold enthusiastically embraced the new subculture. His employees wore facial piercings and spiked collars, and Arnold started booking shows for groups like the Dead Kennedys, developing longstanding relationships with artists like Jello Biafra, Wendy O. Williams and GG Allin. He kept a cage of live rats in the center of his store, a gimmick that appealed to his new customers. Online, you can find a number of nostalgic tributes to the ’80s Charleston punk scene, many of which cite The Prism as a crucial gateway to the underground. (Jack Hunter, a radio host and former writer and aide for Rand Paul, told me he purchased his “entire Sex Pistols record collection there when I was in high school.”) You can imagine the appeal of punk’s proudly outcast ethos to the albino child of a paranoid schizophrenic. For their part, the punks made Arnold into a kind of mascot, “Billy ‘Bino,” and several of the online remembrances contain speculation as to the mystery of his whereabouts.

In September 1989, Hurricane Hugo struck the coast of Charleston. The Category 4 storm brought with it winds of up to 140 mph, and large areas of the city were devastated, Arnold’s store included. He estimated the initial inventory loss at $10,000 — the roof of the store’s warehouse was dislodged entirely in the storm. He lost electricity for two weeks, and, as he told Billboard in an interview the following month, he assumed the resulting lack of air conditioning had inflicted even further damage. Moreover, Arnold had no insurance. “I’ve been in business for over 18 years, and we never had insurance for our inventory,” Arnold said. “We hardly ever have hurricanes here. I think the last one was in 1958.”

Among the objects lost were important pieces of Arnold’s Beatles collection, artifacts of incalculable sentimental value. On top of everything else, there was the cruel fate of his favorite pets. “When the hurricane came, the rats died in the flood,” Durst told me. “It was a sad day for him.” ”

Fred Arnold died a homeless person at the age of 67 when he stepped into the path of a car in December of 2015 in Little Rock, AR.

 

In closing of the Melvin Records chapter I once again highly recommend this well written article the above quotes were taken from:

http://www.arktimes.com/arkansas/the-ballad-of-fred-and-yoko/Content?oid=4345986