Archive

WCF releases

 

I believe the WCF 2001 – 58 series was the first time the label used the folder-type covers and all the reissued titles that had them came later. Based on two contemporary recordings among the first 10 titles – 2006/07 Led Zeppelin – Bonzo’s Birthday Party and 2011/12 Allman Brothers – Watkins Glen July 28/73 – the second half of 1973 appears as the most likely release date/ start of the series.

Matrix: 2001 A / B and 2002 A / B

It is relatively easy to distinguish the WCF copy from the Record Revolution original:

  • Pink cover vs. a rather muted red and blue as seen below;
  • Back cover design changed by incorporating cover art from the HH version (see below) providing a track list;
  • Blank white labels vs. printed red or blue ones;
  • Logo removed from the inside of the folder, lower left.

 

 

The original Record Revolution version. It must have been released fairly soon after the broadcast and became the first Dead recording enjoying wide circulation (“Since the album appears to have been made in 1971, the song titles are just guesses (“Had To Move,” “My Uncle” and “No Chance Of Losing” for example.” quote found in the first link posted below). The matrix was GD-R 1/2/3/4

Source: KSAN/KSFX & KMET FM broadcast, closing of the Fillmore West, 02 July 1971

http://lostlivedead.blogspot.com/2014/09/july-2-1971-fillmore-west-san-francisco.html

The blue double lp that I had was regularly seen in Bay Area used record stores for the next several years–it was about as near to a “regional hit” as a bootleg could ever be considered. It’s not surprising. A local show, broadcast locally, pressed somehow, and quietly distributed to sufficiently cool stores. That was, in fact, pretty common on the East Coast and less so in the Bay Area...”

Opinions on how well the Dead played that night seem to differ quite quite a bit:

https://archive.org/details/gd71-07-02.sbd.backus.11798.sbeok.shnf/gd1971-07-02d3t03.shn

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Towards the end of 1972, TMOQ1 released their own version of this recording (matrix: GD – 527 – A / B). Does the added ‘1’ meant that this might have been planned as a two volume release?

 

Regarding the purple pressing, which sold for $236 in 2012, the seller wrote the following:

“…but the real rarity of this fabulous copy is the color. Look up this album on Popsike.com and you won’t see any that have sold that are of Purple Vinyl! What few copies of this that do exist are seen in the more typical colors of Yellow, Green, Red or Black. This may be the only copy known to exist in purple…”

While it’s probably not the only purple copy ever made, it sure is very rare.

  • Reissues:

Ken”s TMOQ2 matrix: 2805 A-D

Ken’s smoking pig-branded insert has also been found on copies with the original red & blue printed labels but in a black cardboard cover (matrix: GD-R 1-4)  and even on WCF copies.

  • HH DEAD FILLMORE 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 matrix versions:

One of these has the same insert art work but no smoking pig. I suspect Ken nicked the art work from this version and not the other way around but please correct me if this is wrong. As for the copy with classic pig labels, smoking pig branded insert and the HH matrix, I have no explanation at this time. I do believe the seller was not mixed up when posting the matrix #.

 

  • Reissues, pt.2: S-204/K&S versions:

Almost identical appearance but not manufactured at the same time perhaps: The regular S-204 reissue and the K&S destined pressing with the deletion hole and yellow insert, as described in HW.

100 pressed and most were busted and destroyed in 1980 upon re-entry into Canada as “deletes” with punched covers. Those not destroyed were returned (due to a lack of laws making bootlegs illegal). This copy was “rescued” from the returned survivors. From the same shipment as the Flamin’ Groovies of which only 19 copies survived.”

 

 

 

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2299 THE WHO – collector’s item -> this can now be found in updated form as part of this collector’s item label summary post

2235 JIM HENDRIX – ‘SCUSE ME WHILE I KISS THE SKY -> I was not able to find an image for this. If you have one, please leave a comment.

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Matrix: 6969 A/B (the included Donovan label was only included to show where the mirror image on the Dead label originated from)

The insert cover version above and the folder cover reissue from around 1974/5 below:

 

 

Source: Soundboard, recorded on 02 May, 1970 at Harpur College in Binghampton, NY, on half track 7½ ips analog tapes. “In a 1993 poll of Grateful Dead tape traders, the 5/2/70 show was ranked #6 on the list of all-time favorite Dead concert tapes.” The complete show, including the second and third sets (in mono) was officially released as Dick’s Picks Volume 8 in June of 1997 as a 3-CD set.

https://archive.org/details/gd1970-05-02.138227.sbd.miller.flac1648

 

Above: Other versions/later reissues:

  • Nepalese Productions / Har-Glo Records JCS-7001 version advertising the “Crateful Dead”
  • Black Gold Concerts was the new label name Berkeley Records used in the second half of the 1970’s (BG 6969)
  • (not shown) Version with “Karma City” labels
  • Side 1 of Ken’s SILENT DEAD – (smoking pig) TMOQ 73010 used four tracks from this date.

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More material from this date appeared on this title, shown here with all three slip sheet variations (black & red; orange and b&w):

Although the 803-A/B matrix looks like a WCF release not much else does. The insert design has none of the WCF-typical features and the record label has an inner ring, never seen with WCF pressings. On the other hand, there is also a gatefold reissue that does look very much like it may be part of their 1974 reissue series that placed an image or drawing of (one of) the artist(s) on the back panel.

If you know more about this release, please leave a comment.

Likely a copy of this early, ca. 1971, Contraband release (the use of “Microgroove” gives it away) that I had not been aware of so far. HW didn’t mention it (on the other hand, they mention a version called Solo ’65 that I cannot confirm exists):

 A further clue is HW’s quality rating for the WCF album: “Vgs, hissing”. Clearly, this was a couple of generations removed from the original.

In a past eBay auction this CBM album was mis-identified as an advance pressing of the official album due to the stamped title. A rare but funny misunderstanding (for those hip to the world of bootlegs).

For comparison purposes, here is another CBM title released around the same time:

Hendrix Munia yel

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The official release from August 1965:

Apparently, the story goes that Simon spent a lot of time in London in the summer of ’65 and as his album with Garfunkel, Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M. had not been released in the UK (yet), he decided to record his own solo album, which would get a limited release in the Commonwealth countries (UK, CAN, AUS, NZ) only. By the time rock bootlegs had been invented this made the album attractive for those in the US not minding to get involved in a bit of piracy, despite the flagrant copyright violation.

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Even TMOQ could not resist and released their own re-sequenced version around May of 1971.

A1  Kathy’s Song
A2  He Was My Brother
A3  Flowers Never Bend with the Rainfall
A4  The Side of a Hill
A5  A Simple Desultory Philippic
A6  Patterns
B1  A Most Peculiar Man
B2  I Am a Rock
B3  A Church Is Burning
B4  April Come She Will
B5  Leaves That Are Green
B6  The Sound of Silence

Here are early versions from ’71/2:

And later ones:

 

I have never seen an insert for this nor a smoking pig label version. Do they exist?

 

 

Matrix : 1973 A  /  1973 B

The first WCF release of their copy of disc two of the TMOQ double. Note how a xerox of TMOQ’s stamped title was used for WCF cut & paste art work (I have included the complete stamp as it appears on a TMOQ reissue). The track list missed “That’s The Way” which should be the 2nd song on the A-side.

Released in 1973, after TMOQ had reissued the title with a stamped cover.

WCF reissued this title as part of their folder reissues ca. 1974-5. A copy seen on eBay has the black generic Berkeley labels with the 1975 copyright date, so these types of covers were still in use after their re-branding as a bootleg label with a proper name in that year, The reprint was not kind to Jimmy’s photo on the front, robbing it of whatever little contrast it had left the first time around. On the other hand, he now occupied “prime real estate” on the back panel.

 

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The TMOQ originals:

  1. Folder cover, perhaps released in this form as early as (late) 1971 due to the evidence from the Neil Young video mentioned below.

The TMOQ wiki places this release – later numbered 72004 – in February of 1973 but that appears to be wrong (a buyer in the UK received his copy on Friday, the 19th of January 1973). We need a collector who wrote down when exactly they bought this particular version.

 

A pendant to this Crosby & Nash release (#72005, I read it was taped at L.A.’s Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on 10 October 1971 and not in Berkeley, as stated in a 2017 Tight But Loose article – is this correct? ), which can be seen in the film clip in which Neil Young discovers bootlegs in an L.A. record store, likely filmed in November or December of 1971 (a Rolling Stone magazine with a cover date of 09 Dec. ’71 can be spotted), YT title “Neil Young finds bootleg records of his own work in an LA store – 1971 ”

The theory supporting the late 1971 release date for the Led Zeppelin title will make the convincing point that both titles were released at the same time in their similar packaging.

 

C&N VSE 2

Above: Neil confronting the store clerk with the album.

The evidence chain used in the 2017 Tight But Loose article dating the album to late 1972 runs like this:

  • The same taper – not Dub – recorded these two shows at the Berkeley Community Theater in September and October of ’71.
  • It then took a few months for the tapes to reach Dub/TMOQ.
  • An ad from a UK bootleg mail order company advertising both releases as new is also shown as evidence.

AA NEW LZ + C.N.

  • However, the album(s) received after ordering is not the folder version but the stamped & sticker-ed (later) version and since the folder version clearly came earlier, the theory formulated in TBL fails at this point.

TMOQ trying folder style covers years before WCF did. It appears these were the only two titles receiving this treatment.

 

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With an alternate insert. As pointed out in the comment section by YesDays, the images used here come from 1975.

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With Stout designed insert, ca. mid-1973:

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Later versions:

 

There are many more pressings but I’ll just concentrate on the earlier ones.

 

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http://jimmypagemusic.blogspot.com/2015/09/on-this-day-13-september.html

http://www.rambleonzep.com/dates/1971-09-14.htm

The famous recording from Berkeley’s Community Theater, 2nd night, 14 September 1971. The master tape has never surfaced to the best of my knowledge and even the pressing plates may have ended up in the Pacific ocean around 1980 in an attack of paranoia by Ken’s associate Michael.

 

Master tape details: Immigrant Song >> Heartbreaker (<< Bouree..), [ cut ], Since I’ve Been Loving You [ cut ], [ cut ], Out On The Tiles Intro >> Black Dog, [ cut ], Dazed And Confused (<< Back In The USA..) [ cut ], [ cut ], Stairway To Heaven, [ cut ], That’s The Way [ cut ], Going To California, [ cut ], Whole Lotta Love (<< Just A Little Bit, Boogie Chillun, Hello Mary Lou, My Baby Left Me, Mess O’ Blues, You Shook Me, The Lemon Song..)


Quality rating: Excellent, slightly top-heavy.   Length: 96 minutes, missing is the encore.
argenteumastrum states: Surprisingly clear recording taped much close to the stage without any distortion! All the instruments are perfectly balanced and almost no hiss here.

LZ BCT ad '71 II

 

 

 

Matrix : 1806 A  /  1806 B

 

 

Matrix: 1807 – A   /  1807 – B

WCF did some of the worst ever “song title mangling” bootleggers sometimes committed as they were not familiar with an artist’s repertoire, on the blue volume: “Moonoge Dyelseom”, “Gene Genie” and “Luffragete City”.

I do believe WCF made this first available in the form of single albums (just like TMOQ did) only to be distinguished by their color but a double version also appears to have been made:

 

 

Year of release: 1973, perhaps late spring or middle of the year

Reissued ca. 1974/5 with a redesigned cover:

 

 

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Source: KMET-FM’s broadcast of Bowie’s first of two shows at the Santa Monica Civic Center on 20 October, 1972. RCA also recorded the performance on multi-track tapes (and then left them in the vault for 22 years while the bootlegs from this show gained a reputation for their un-bootleg-like excellent sound quality and Bowie’s A-game performance that would even eclipse the official David Live a couple of years later.

Bowie SM 72 pic

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Now, coming back to the red & blue first releases, these are referred to as the very first Bowie bootlegs. While I agree with him on the release date being 1973, he is off on dating the TMOQ titles IN PERSON & IN AMERICA as only having been released in 1974. Using the TMOQ RecordWiki (that used to be posted under the recordcollectorsguild.org) as I have done throughout the blog, as the dates have so far been the most detailed and only one error could so far been found by a major bootleg collector, IN PERSON would date around January of 1973 (#71054, matrix: DB – 528) and IN AMERICA (#71062, matrix DB – 531) from around April of ’73.

 

Regarding the order of the TMOQ releases, Bassman is also incorrect when describing the first version, “The first and original discs came in a so called TMQ Production cover, and they all have labels with the songs listed on one side and the TMQ pig on the other.” I have shown these versions below. The cartoon cover edition was not the first but came after the generic farm pig label editions on colored vinyl and in stamped and sticker-ed covers.

So, Ziggy in concert. was not the first David Bowie bootleg but IN PERSON was.

There are also differences in content & quality between both labels:

  • TMOQ edited the the DJ talk out, WCF left it in.
  • TMOQ had the edge when it came to the sound quality.

 

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I came across this CBM copy presenting the second half of the show, likely taken from IN AMERICA, and winning the award for Most Minimalist Cover Art. It appears that this is the only Bowie title they ever put out. I did not find any evidence that they had copied IN PERSON as well.

Released around 1974.

 

Matrix: 2810-C  /   2810-D

Curiously, it shares its matrix number with Ken”s issue of the In Person / In America material, which he released as a double album:

Bowie Santa Monica double

Matrix: 1847/2810

 

Matrix: ( side A none ) / 999 – B

Also exists with a blank yellow label, as seen on WCF’s copy of Rod Stewart with the Faces live at the L.A. Forum.

Released ca. 1972 – it should be noted that WCF did not release their albums in a strict chronological order, so this album numbered 999 was not released after 901 & 902 (JETHRO TULL – US TOUR APRIL 1972; ROLLING STONES – THE STONES AMERICAN TOUR IN L.A. 1972) but likely earlier.

The title may have been a joke perhaps. Nassau Coliseum held its first rock concert – Three Dog Night – (a couple of months after its opening) on 29 April 1972 and none of the tracks on this album sounded like they had been recorded live at an arena.

It was no surprise then that when the album was reissued by WCF in 1973/4, it received a new title (still misleading though).

Matrix : 999 A  /  999 B

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WCF had copied this album from this rare and half-decent Beatles bootleg released in 1971, THE BEATLES LAST ALBUM

Matrix: 0171 – 01 1971

Three partial Christmas flexi disc recordings (1966, ’67 & ’69), pirates of the German version of “She Loves You” and the John & Paul 45 plus the highlights and first ever release of their David Frost performance in 1968 (years before the Deccagone 45), three songs from their BBC Top Gear appearance as described below and also “Shout” from their ’64 Around The Beatles TV special. Really not too bad for 1971.

“More material appeared in the early Seventies. This did not usually fill a complete LP; one or a few tracks, at times a single programme, were added to other material. The first programme to appear was Top Of The Pops, the U.S. rebroadcast of Top Gear July 16, 1964. This was independently released by an anonymous label on the album titled THE BEATLES LAST ALBUM, and by CBM on THE NEVER RELEASED MARY JANE. The first one was released in (possibly) late 1971 or early 1972, matrix 01 971. It was copied in 1972 by White Cover Folks as LIVE AT NASSAU, matrix 999, originally distributed with a yellow label. This album was repressed in 1973 and 1974 as TOP OF THE POPS/LIVE IN GERMANY. The CBM record (THE NEVER RELEASED MARY JANE), with matrix 3585, was originally distributed in November 1972 with a purple slipsheet and label with printed title. The subsequent issues had generic labels and usually a blue printed insert. This session was also included on a record by Highway HiFi, a subsidiary of TMOQ-Smokin’ Pig, titled TOP OF THE POPS, matrix HHCER 111. This LP was first issued in mid-1974 with a slipsheet printed with “rainbow” effect, and repressed a number of times until 1983.” [ excerpt from A COMPREHENSIVE BEATLES HISTORY of THE BEATLES’ BBC Bootleg Releases. (ref: Great Dane’s Complete BBC Sessions liner notes) ]

THE BEATLES LAST ALBUM had previously been reviewed in this post from 2013.