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TMOQ (smoking pig)

Grateful Dead Live DeadGrateful Dead Live Dead 2

The Dead played two sets at the ‘Closing of the Fillmore West’ five day concert series. Their performance took place on July 2nd, lasting into the early hours of the 3rd.Same source as Dittolino’s Creedence Clearwater Revival release featured on this blog recently.

“This was an FM broadcast. I heard it live on KMET FM in Los Angeles. I was a lifeguard in Newport Beach at the time. My friends and I were all pumped up to hear this show since KMET was building it up all week long. We gathered around the stereo and listened, and I remember the NRPS show too. It was also broadcast. I remember wishing I had a recorder, but it was 1971, I was a poor just graduated high school kid and, oh well, hey, I just found the show again when I was 53. Not bad! This show was also available a few months later on a bootleg vinyl that I bought and wore out on the old phonograph device.”
“This is from the KSFX-FM broadcast the night of the show.KSAN in SF and KMET in LA also aired the live broadcast.”

Read more: http://www.deadlistening.com/2009/04/1971-july-02-fillmore-west.html#ixzz382BoxzSC

Set 1:

1 Bill Graham Introduction 00:53
    2 Bertha 06:01
    3 Me And Bobby McGee 08:01
4 Next Time You See Me 05:13
    5 China Cat Sunflower 07:25
    6 I Know You Rider 06:01
7 Playing In The Band 09:00
    8 Loser 10:12
    9 Ain’t It Crazy (The Rub) 05:36
    10 Me and My Uncle 04:16
    11 Big Railroad Blues 03:49
    12 Hard To Handle 08:03
    13 Deal 07:20
    14 Promised Land 03:20
    15 Good Lovin’ 18:25

Set 2:

1 Sugar Magnolia 07:12
    2 Sing Me Back Home 10:42
    3 Mama Tried 04:01
    4 Dedication to Owsley 00:54
    5 Cryptical Envelopment 02:06
    6 Drums 05:16
    7 The Other One 16:18
    8 Big Boss Man 06:14
    9 Casey Jones 06:39
    10 Not Fade Away 04:11
    11 Goin’ Down The Road Feelin’ Bad 08:39
    12 Not Fade Away 09:26
    13 Johnny B. Goode 03:57

It seems that many of these performances made it onto the double set but I am not enough of an expert to confirm what is missing.

 

Grateful Dead Mystery of the

This auction from February of 2013 called the album mystery of the dead but this was most likely a made up title but this is obviously a copy of LIVE DEAD, visually enhanced by a former owner with the added photos.

“this is a mysterious looking album […] on dittolino label, the cover has a picture of garcia on the front and the band on the back, i hav’nt seen the garcia picture before the back one looks like it may have come off historic dead? i do not know,  the songlist side 1. 1. bertha 2. bobby mcgee 3. lied, cheated 4. china cat 5. i know you rider side 2. 1. playing in the band 2. loser 3. aint it crazy 4. me and my uncle 5. railroad blues 6. sunshine daydream side 3. 1. sing me back home 2. mama tried . casey jones 5. johnny b. goode side 4. 1. sugar magnolia 2.uncles john’s band 3 the other one, dedicated to owsley “in jail”, this is an album i have not seen before, i believe it to be very rare, this is a soundboard recording, live from somewhere, bill graham does an intro,”

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This was a popular bootleg due to its excellent sound quality and was issued by many bootleggers. Who was first? I actually do not know in this case.

Grateful Dead live Dittolini b

Available in blue and pink. The front covers are identical but the back covers are not.

Grateful Dead Live Fillmore pink

Referred to as a Dittolino release at auction, this version looks like an early Berkely release to me, presented by “Record Revolution”. Hopefully, nobody happened upon this cover art while under the influence of a bad LSD trip – I’d hate to have this crowd come to life and jump off the cover.

Grateful Dead Live Ditto Inner

Grateful Dead live Dittolini

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Grateful Dead F West HH 2

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Grateful Dead F West HH

Matrix: HH Dead Fillmore

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Grateful Dead Fillmore West g r

Grateful Dead Fillmore West cv

Garteful Dead Fillmore West mcv

Strange labels on these colored releases with the smoking pig logo.

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Grateful Dead Fillmore W 2805

TMOQ 71014 – one of Ken’s releases and mentioned in the recordcollectorsguild.org TMOQ – 2 wiki but without a release date.          I would pinpoint the year to 1973 as ‘smoking pig’ 72012 – Alice Cooper – You’re All Crazier Than I Am  [to be distinguished from Dub’s # 71012: The Beatles Vancouver 1964 ] was released in that year. 

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The TMOQ / mammary presentations MM 4 release recorded LIVE in concert – matrix: MEL (later editions with the printed Kama Sutra cover had DEAD-2/1), seems to derive from a radio broadcast from the Winterland in 1970 (October 4th?) and not from the last night at the Fillmore West as listed in HOTWACKS.

 

Fillmore West Closing

Two tracks – “Casey Jones” and “Johnny B. Goode” were officially released in 1972 on the 3 LP set Fillmore – The Last Days

031:

Reed L BHMFReed L BHMF disc

This seems to have been the point where the infamous shipping problems started: “150 pressed from the original WRMB plates. Most were lost in shipping. Exm.”

Revisit the complete post for the Sydney recording under this link.

032:

Pink Floyd 032 ptPink Floyd 032Pink Floyd 032 disc

“Roughly Half of the 200 run were lost in shipment.”

Bootleg background can be found here.

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033:

Flamin Groovies RoxyFlamin Groovies Roxy disc

“Although 200 copies were pressed on blue vinyl, this is an extremely rare record as most of the copies were lost in shipment.”

Bootleg background info to be found here.

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034:

Stewart R Net Wht 034Stewart R Net Wht 034 disc

“150 pressed on MCV & 150 pressed on black vinyl.”

Source: Dayto, OH – Hara Arena – 17 July 1971 [the bands 4th American Tour. And right after the release of their Every Picture Tells A Story album]

710717_Dayton

Side 1: Three Button Hand Me Down / Maybe I’m Amazed / Country Comforts / Love In Vain        Side2:  Had Me A Real Good Time-Every Picture Tells A Story / Around The Plynth-An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down-Gasoline Alley-Around The Plynth

Quality:  Decent, “Exm, vocals a bit weak”, according to Hot Wacks. The ROOTIE NEWTON ROLL PRESENTATIONS version is listed as “Exs”, probably incorrect.

This album had previously been released by TMOQ as and Dittolino/ROOTIE NEWTON ROLL PRESENTATIONS  #5407 and I suspect it’s a reissue from the TMOQ plates.

Performance was the last and is the rarest of the four TMOQ Rod Stewart & The Faces titles, It was never assigned a 710XX number and is only known by its matrix # 1867.  The other three are # 71016 Plynth, # 71052 Had Me A Real Good Time and # 1817 Dancing In The Street .

Date of release: 1974 based on the closest previous release, a reissue of Dylan’s Troubled Troubadour with four extra tracks not added to the newly created insert (showing images from his 1974 live dates) and with the matrix # 1865 B / D (see final image in this post).

Stewart R & Faces Performance 1867 bluStewart R & Faces Performance 1867 tan

In discussing the TMOQ catalogue dated July 1st 1973, the initiator of the 2006 thread “Homegenizing TMOQ” on recordcollectorsguild.org wrote: “add to the previous booklet the statement “Be sure it’s a genuine “Trade Mark of Quality disc” (Dub’s?). […] Should this booklet be Dubs, according to the “genuine disc” statement, the common believe[sic] that credits the four-figures matrixes 18XX, 28XX to Ken’s records only should be revised.”

Ken: “Until [Dub] went to printed jackets I had everything he had, plus everything I was making. There were a few where I couldn’t get stampers off his mothers, either because the mother was damaged or he’d skipped that part of the process or he didn’t leave the mother at Lewis. Winter Tour and Stones at the Hollywood Palladium come to mind. But I might be wrong about those. In those few cases, my records would have a different stamper number. But for the most part, Lewis pretty much made me whatever I wanted of his.

Dub and I did not do the Greatful Dead Mammery [sic] record or the Buffalo Springfield or that Double ELP. They were done by my college pal Malcolm.

I don’t ever remember scratching out a stamper number, but I do know that some of my records had numbers changed. I had a series of different partners and pressed records in six different plants and oftentimes the same record would be given a new title and perhaps that’s why some of my stamper numbers got changed.”

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Stewart R Net Wht altStewart R Net Wht alt 1

As can be seen in the detail above, the title “Performance”is quoted here, leading me to believe that the TMOQ version came out first. Also “Love In Vain” is correctly titled here, while it is listed as “It’s All Over Now” on the insert sheets for Performance.

Stewart R Net Wht 034 Ditto

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TMOQ 1865:

Dylan Troubl Trouba 1865

LIVE AT HAMMERSMITH ODEON

Springsteen atHammersmith

A) Ruthless Rhymes labels. Orange/Blue/Yellow insert. Matrix BS 1975 (same for all versions)
B) Slipped disc labels. Various insert colors
C) Blue blank labels. Deep Yellow/Orange inserts
E) Raring Records label – first time with wrap-around insert ca. 1981                                                                 D) Smoking Pig labels with wrap-around insert

The bootleg section of brucespringsteen.it reports that the inserts used for C) & E) show signs of having been copied (I will spare you the discussion of shadows between monkey legs… ). More importantly, two types of inserts exist: The standard single sheet version and a slightly re-designed wrap around version with a Bruce-Landau meeting story on the flip side, reminiscent of of a lot of Vicky Vinyl product 1976-77 (see below):

Springsteen Hammersmith Odeon it

This live recording from 18 November 1975 has since been officially released in 2005 on the Born To Run: 30th Anniversary 3-Disc Set .

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“E” Ticket

Springsteen E Ticket 6

Springsteen E Ticket

Springsteen E Ticket bBack of the LP track listing, obviously not written by a German native speaker

Springsteen E Ticket b2The number shown on the top right hand corner of the LP is identical with the matrix number. Also available with blank white and green “hörweite stereophonie” labels, as expected.

Side 1:

Rosalita (Come out tonight)      New York,NY,914 Studios(USA) 01-Jul-1973/1        Instrumental  
Kitty’s back                                                                                                    ”                            –         
Thunder road                               New York,NY,Record Plant(USA) 01-Mar-1975/1        –       
4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy) New York,NY,914 Studios(USA) 01-Jul-1973/1     Instrumental

Side 2:
Walking in the streets          New York,NY,Record Plant(USA) 01-Mar-1975/1                     –   
She’s the one                                                                                                ”                                    –   
A love so fine              New York,NY,????(USA) 16-Oct-1974/1                                        Instrumental
Born to run                  New York,NY,914 Studios(USA) 01-Aug-1974/1                                    – 
Thunder road              New York,NY,Record Plant(USA) 01-Mar-1975/1                       Acoustic  
Jungleland                                                                                           ”                                   ending w. chorus

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Then there were two advance copy versions that might not actually be genuine – confirmation needed:

Springsteen E Ticket adv

“A blank-cover pre-release is rumored to exist, and it should be a white stamped and hand numbered white sleeve with the same matrix and labels. It’s unclear the role of the so-called ‘advance pressing’ stamped cover edition with custom green labels(ST/MX1), since this circulated massively and at low cost in late ’80, and it seems a modern reprint, carrying an evident reprint of the ‘head’ variant of the label.” [brucespringsteen.it, from where I also borrowed a few images]

Springsteen E Ticket adv.png 2

In the 1980’s also reissued as a picture disc.

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The book Warman’s American Records includes a picture of this bootleg with the caption “Bruce Springsteen was very upset when he saw this album “E Ticket”, available in independent record stores – with early rough mixes of songs from his Born To Run album.

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BORN TO ROCK

Springsteen Born T RkSpringsteen Born T Rk bObviously not a genuine Ruthless Rhymes product. Also found with “Guilty” labels (another clue) and usually on black PVC.

Tower Theatre, Philadelphia (Upper Darby), PA, USA – December 31, 1975

“This show was the last of a four-night stand (27, 28, 30, 31 December) at the Tower Theatre. Recent events had given Springsteen much publicity and a national profile. Ninety thousand people consequently applied for tickets to see him at this three thousand seat venue. The first thirteen of the eighteen songs played appeared on the double LP Born To Rock (Ruthless Rhymes).

Mike Appel, Springsteen’s then manager, wanted to capitalise on the success of Born To Run with a double or triple LP of live performances. Accordingly, the Tower Theatre shows were recorded, along with concerts in Greenvale, NY (12 December) and Toronto, Canada (21 December), using the Record Plant’s mobile unit with Jimmy Iovine responsible for the recording. Songs from the now-legendary shows at the Bottom Line and the Roxy Theatre earlier in the year were also under consideration for the album. A live album would have been a good idea. Springsteen had already built up a formidable reputation as a live performer, enhanced by radio broadcasts of live shows and cemented by the production of bootlegs of these performances. In particular, Springsteen fan Lou Cohan had produced LPs of the Bottom Line and Roxy shows. As Clinton Heylin writes in his bootleg history, The Great White Wonders, this “was clearly one instance where bootlegs were helping to establish an artist rather than riding on the back of his success.” A live album would also presumably have been much quicker to produce, avoiding the excruciatingly prolonged process that had finally resulted in Born To Run, and getting another album into the record shops while interest in Springsteen was still considerable.

The reason that this live album failed to appear is bound up with the power struggle between Appel and Springsteen’s future manager, Jon Landau. According to Dave Marsh, in his book Born To Run, Springsteen “felt that the band’s onstage excitement wasn’t ready to be captured yet.” Marc Eliot’s The Making Of Bruce Springsteen tells a different story, suggesting that Springsteen initially favoured a live release but was dissuaded by Landau. Landau had been brought in to co-produce Born To Run. He had not only handled production duties but had done much to sort out the impasse and get the album released. Appel, seemingly wary of Landau’s influence, told Landau that he would, of course, work on the next studio album, but that he would not be required for the live LP. In a seeming attempt to marginalise Landau, Appel also pointed out to Springsteen that “it would be foolish to have Jon Landau as a producer of a live album where he had no experience.” As is well known, Landau supplanted Appel as Springsteen’s manager and no live album appeared.” [collectorsmusicreview.com]

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SMALL TOWN BOY

Springsteen ST Boy bSpringsteen ST BoyMatrix: 24473

The back cover mentions ‘Contessa Records’, so this was clearly produced by someone else. Later repressed and now more commonly known as the Swingin’Pig release under the same title from the second half of the 1980s.

Deep Purple JMTYL 2

Deep Purple JMTYL detail

Rolling Stones Rock Out Cock Out detail

There were two different cover designs, the “Music From Big Purple” shown above with the two figures in the bottom right corner and one without:

Deep Purple JMTYL

Deep Purple JMTYL Duck Hits MBP 990 A

Both versions can be found with “Duck Hits!”and Ruthless Rhymes labels. I did not find this with the blue 1970’s GLC labels shown previously with the Stones release and the Beatles Beatlemania but the Deep Purple LP can be found with the following matrix: 

GLC-212-A  re  /  GLC-212-B

– called the second pressing, which would support my theory that these releases date from around 1977.

Deep Purple JMTYL RR

This looks like a third cover variation.

Just as in the first example, I have found another one where the track list for side 2 is hidden or censored. Coincidentally, Hot Wacks states that only side 1 is from the California Jam Festival and side two contains pirated material from the official release In Concert.

Deep Purple JMTYL censored

The other vinyl bootleg to compare this with in term’s of sound quality would be PERKS AND TIT on TAKRL (also the one I would go to first, had this not since been officially released, as it has more California Jam material).

Set list taken from the 2003 official release:

Burn    (6:20)
Might Just Take Your Life    (4:50)
Lay Down, Stay Down    (4:46)
Mistreated    (10:24)    
Smoke On The Water    (8:56)
You Fool No One    (19:09)
Space Truckin’    (25:10)

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Yet another link between the Stones and the Deep Purple LP is that they have been listed with PQ numbers. In Hot Wacks rock out – cock out is listed as PQ211.

Just Might Take Your Life carries PQ 2004, which is also printed on the slip sheet.

I have now stumbled over another example, clearly produced by the same folks with a penchant for hallucinogenic cover art and an overall similar lay out:  PQ 401

Grateful Dead Double Dead

Not found with a GLC label but a plain white one:

Grateful Dead Double Dead lbl

which confirms my thesis that the 70s GLC label was used considerably later than 1974.

It is not hard to date DOUBLE DEAD , as it was a ‘Frankenstein’ creation born by combining Felt Forum 1971 and, more importantly for us, SILENT DEAD – TMoQ 73010. As ‘smoking pig’ releases 73008 (Dylan – Best of GWW) and 73018 (James Paul McCartney) have been confirmed as 1974 releases – the Dylan cover uses an image from his early 1974 tour – SILENT DEAD was released in the same year and DOUBLE DEAD subsequently after that.

If you know any further PQ releases, or have any other comments or additions, do let me know.

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A little excursion:

Coming back to that “Deep Purple” and DYLAN & THE BAND 1974 title font – it rang a bell too.

“Information:
A very rare and misunderstood LP from 1974 from the folks that would become TMOQ-2. The confusion lies both with the relative unavailability of the LP, and with misinformation of earlier chronologies. The earlier guides, Cable and Hot Wacks, failed to list it altogether. As it doesn’t have an actual title, it has been referred to by several. “1974” and “Oakland” among them. Great White Answers gives it the title “We Didn’t Really Get It On Until Oackland” from a misspelling of a quote on the back insert.

It also states that the cover is full printed. Most likely it never was. GWA also reports a blank label. While there might have been one or two blank, the labels were actually full printed with a “Great Live Concerts” label. More confusion set in with the publication of Raging Glory. It titles the set “Dylan & The Band 1974”. While it correctly lists the package features of two inserts and blue and yellow labels, it states that the set is a 1985 reissue of the original 1974 release. There was no reissue. The fact is, there were only a few copies manufactured in 1974 (Heylin suggests a 1977 date, although that would negate the theory of the piece being produced during the TMOQ changeover). They have inserts and full printed labels. GWA reported “Rolling Stones” LPs issued in the covers as well, but this is doubtful.

Whatever the reason for the small quantity run, at about the same time period TMOQ was releasing the St. Valentine Day box. This was from the show of 3 days later at Inglewood. Since the two shows were similar, it’s very feasible that this project simply got lost in the hubbub of the other projects, and in the transfer of power between the TMOQ regimes.

8 stars      NMP250

gwa95
Matrix: # 411 A/B/C/D”  

 

Deep Purple JMTYL detail title

Dylan & Band wdrgiouO 2

Deep Purple Murky Waters detail

Jethro Tull Superchd cropped

and:

Stevens C THMDD

Note how inserts with this font hawk the supposedly high fidelity of the recording.

…And there’s more!

Stevens Cat Catnip title

Stevens Cat Catnip 2

Here is a copy/reissue of TAKRL’s # 2927: British Tour 1973 – Untitled

John Elton BBB Benny

It appears that the 2 LP releases all had a front and a back insert like this one.

John Elton BBB Benny 2

Aha!

All of these releases can be found with black number labels as shown – however, they were clearly released much earlier than 1977, probably around 1974.  So for the Deep Purple re-issue, this might just have been “font recycling”.

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The ‘number labels’ & 70’s GLC connection is further cemented by this recent Bob Dylan ‘combo’ discovery that I did not find documented on bobsboots.com:

Dylan JBSB Stealin

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To summarize, the starting point was releases made by Vicki Vinyl on her Dragonfly/Duck Hits! label, including reissues.

This blog post traces similarities in the insert design between the two releases mentioned in the title and the rare Bob Dylan double set shown and the question: When was that Dylan double released? 1974 or 1977?

The font shared with the other bootlegs points to 1974 but the fact that it is only found with the early GLC (or Dragonfly) labels points to 1977. Perhaps there was a reissue of the Dylan title after all?

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font 2013

The font alive and kicking on Robert Plant’s 2014 tour poster, seen in December 2013.

Rolling Stones 2nd Incarnation Source: San Diego Sports Arena, 10 November 1969 – Ken’s fake Wizardo copy is dated ca. 1977 Side 1:  intro by Sam Cutler – Carol/ Sympathy for the Devil/ Prodigal Son/ You Gotta Move/ Under My Thumb Side 2:  Live with Me/ Little Queenie/ Satisfaction/ Honky Tonk Women/ Street Fighting Man Quality rating: VG-EX mono, recorded on the same equipment used for Liver… and Blueberry Hill. Complete concert set list: 01. intro [00:40] 01. Jumping Jack Flash [03:30] 02. Carol [03:49] 03. Sympathy For The Devil [05:43] 04. Stray Cat Blues [04:26] 05. Prodigal Son [03:57] 06. You Gotta Move [03:16] 07. Love In Vain [05:23] 08. I’m Free [05:48] 09. Under My Thumb [02:56] 10. Midnight Rambler [06:39] 11. Live With Me [03:02] 12. LittleQueenie [04:11] 13. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction [06:05] 14. Street Fighting Man [04:06] 15. Honky Tonk Women [04:30]

*** A copy of Dub’s SAN DIEGO ’69 / Stoneaged , which, if things had worked out slightly differently could have been the recording that became famous as THE archetypical live bootleg. Rolling Stones San Diego '69 green Released in 1973. Some collectors say that the CD releases containing the complete version of the concert come from a tape that is several generations away from the master pressed on the original LP, while Swingin’Pig claims “20 bit digital mastering from the original analog tapes”. *** Ken re-used his copied master also for disc 1 of the following double album:

Rolling Stones Midnight Ramblers Rolling Stones Midnight Ramblers b

TMoQ cover- version 1:

McCartney JPM 2

McCartney JPM 3

McCartney JPM

TMoQ cover- version 2:

McCartney JPM design 1 II

McCartney JPM design 1 lbl

Released in 1974, Matrix #: 1882

Side 1: Big Barn Bed/ My Little Woman Love-C Moon/ The Mess/ Maybe I’m Amazed/ Long Tall Sally
Side 2: Another Day/ Oh Woman Oh Why (pirate of the official 45, Apple 1829)/ Hi Hi Hi (pirate of official 45, Apple 1857)/ Gotta Sing Gotta Dance/ Live And Let Die/ Medley: Blackbird – Bluebird – Michelle; Heart Of The Country/ Yesterday (faded out)

Two websites claim that the first or all of the tracks on side one are a re-release of the Live In Scotland material but I believe that to be incorrect. Side 1 is an edit of most of the Wings performances from segments 1, 4 and 10, as listed below. Side two has segments 7, 8 and 11.

Paul McCartney spent February of 1973 in Morocco (staying at the hotel Mamounia in Marrakesh) planning this TV special, presenting Paul as the ‘all-around’ entertainer but falling somewhat short in the end. Broadcast date was 16 April 1973 in the US.

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JPM TVguide

Part 1
The program opens with a live performance by Wings in front of an audience of television screens. – Song: “Big Barn Bed”

JPMcC

Part 2
An acoustic medley of songs is performed by McCartney during a photographic session with his wife Linda as the photographer. – Songs: “Blackbird”, “Bluebird”, “Michelle”, “Heart of the Country”

JPM 2

Part 3
A short music video style performance set in an outdoor location. – Song: “Mary Had a Little Lamb”

Part 4
A television studio performance with Wings and orchestra in front of a live audience.
Songs: “Little Woman Love”, “C Moon”, “My Love”

Part 5
Another music video segment, this time for “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”, however the “Admiral Halsey” section was not included in the final broadcast version. – Song: “Uncle Albert”

Part 6
A short voice-over from Mcartney introduces the next segment set in the Clelsea Reach public house near Liverpool. This features members of Paul’s family and Wings in a pub singalong
Songs: “April Showers”, “Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit-Bag”, “You Are My Sunshine”

JPM Pub singalong

Part 7
A Busby Berkeley style musical number, featuring dancers dressed in half-man/half-woman costumes. Song: “Gotta Sing, Gotta Dance”

Part 8
A music video segment were Paul introduces “Live And Let Die”, the title theme from the 1973 James Bond movie. – Song: “Live and Let Die”

Part 9
Beatles Medley: a filmed segment with street passers-by singing various Beatles songs (off key) to comedic effect. – Songs: “When I’m 64”, “A Hard Day’s Night”, “Can’t Buy Me Love”, “She Loves You”, “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da”, “Yesterday”, “Yellow Submarine”

Part 10
Another live studio performance with Wings. – Songs: “The Mess”, “Maybe I’m Amazed”, “Long Tall Sally” (US broadcast only; the UK and other European market replaced this with “Hi, Hi, Hi”)

Part 11
A live acoustic performance of “Yesterday”. Credits roll over the performance.
Song: “Yesterday”.

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The West coast Berkeley label released this title as well in their pre-Berkeley days (and removed the pig face from the circle):

McCartney JPM Berk

Matrix number 2028

McCartney My Love

And one more time under this title with a b&w cover post-1975.

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Meanwhile, on the East coast:

McCartney JPM v1

McCartney JPM KK

Released in 1974; Matrix 4022 A/B

Contraband copied TMoQ’s cover art but they produced their own edit of the source tape (which then no longer matched the cover track listing), cutting down the number of pirated material significantly and making this the better version (unless you just had to have “Blackbird-Bluebird” and “Big Barn Bed”):

Side 1: Michelle/ Heart Of The Country/ Mary Had A Little Lamb/ Little Woman Love – C Moon/ My Love/ Uncle Albert/ Pub singalong scene (confirmed in the book Eight Arms To Hold You)
Side 2: Gotta Sing Gotta Dance/ Live And Let Die/ The Mess/ Maybe I’m Amazed/ Long Tall Sally/ Another Day (pirated 45)/ Yesterday

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McCartney JPM JL 513

The producers of the JL series in Japan seemed to agree that this was the superior version as they selected this one to be released as JL 513

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In early 1976, Wizardo offered a third and perhaps least bang-for-your-buck version of this material:

Wings Gotta Sing Gotta Dance Secret 4

Wings Secret

Side 1: Big Barn Bed/ Little Woman Love – C Moon / The Mess/ Maybe I m Amazed/ Long Tall Sally/ Gotta Sing Gotta Dance / Live And Let Die
Side 2: Now Hear This Song Of Mine-Let s Go; Woman Oh Why; The Mess (live); Country Dreamer; I Lie Around

Side 1 is parts 1, 4, 10, 7 & 8 from the TV special. Side 2 copies the Brung To Ewe by scarce 1971 promo vinyl with pirated Apple single B-sides (#s1829, 1861, 1863 and 1869); the official material earning the album an “Exm” rating in Hot Wacks.  An ebay seller wrote: “In-between the studio tracks are short segments of a song Paul wrote to promote his “RAM” album.”

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In the 1980’s, this LP on a label that borrowed its name from the Wings fan club publication offered the most complete version of the event and is still listed as the recommended source in Eight Arms…:

McCartney JPM C S

McCartney JPM C S b

Side 1: Big Barn Bed (4:45)/ Blackbird (0:37) – Bluebird (1:20) – Michelle (1:11) – Heart Of The Country (0:46)/ Mary Had A Little Lamb (3:43)/ Little Woman Love – C Moon (2:39)/ My Love (4:28)/ Uncle Albert (2:28)

Side 2: Gotta Sing Gotta Dance (4:10)/Live And Let Die (3:53)/The Mess (4:15)/ Maybe I’m Amazed (3:43)/ Long Tall Sally (2:19)/ Yesterday (3:14)

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If anyone has ever done a quality comparison of these titles or knows where I can find one, do let me know.

“The larger pressing plants we used, used good vinyl (virgin vinyl). The smaller ones would punch out the labels, grind up the vinyl and reuse it and this made for some clicks and pops as that vinyl had already been heated before and also no matter how hard they tried, tiny bits of paper from those labels invariably wound up in the mix. Also, there was the issue of how long you left the record in the press. A full minute made for a much better pressing than a record that was only in for twenty or thirty seconds. Those small plants wanted to make records as fast as possible. And two of those small plants that we used were pretty doggoned filthy. Dirt and dust in the vinyl before it got into the press didn’t exactly make for a good sounding record.

When we went to the bigger plants (and believe me, we wound up at the biggest) they had the vinyl come out of hoppers above the press and only used virgin vinyl, but the small ones saved the crap, gave it to us, because could we complain, go somewhere else? Well, eventually we did.”

“Yeah that pesky band between the songs on an LP. On the studio versions we would use about three seconds of paper tape, so whoever was cutting the record would know to put a band there (sometimes we didn’t thought). On the live albums we didn’t do that, didn’t know you could, though I wondered how the real companies did it. Then one day I was sitting by the lathe when the applause came on after the first song and this guy running the machine reached down and turned a knob and, as if by magic, a band appeared on the acetate and then I had to start putting song times on the tape box to warn him when to make the bands. It was so much easier when all I had to worry about was was the side over twenty-two minutes, but under twenty-eight.”

 

We remember this part from an earlier short Q&A session Ken did:

Q: Do you have a list which TMOQ titles you made on CV?

A: […]Just about every TMOQ record I did was available on colored vinyl at one time or another. We didn’t charge more for colored vinyl and we used it when we could get it. Usually when we pressed at Lewis.

“The CV records all came from one pressing plant. If they had it, they used it. A couple of the guys there liked to experiment and that’s why you have splash vinyl.

I spent two months there pressing records, because a couple of employees quit and Greg (my partner at the time) and myself really needed product. This was before we went to the big plants. We pressed only CV and made many different combinations, especially with splash white vinyl. We could be working along, making a bunch of records red, then all of a sudden, to break the monotony, we’d make a few multicolored or splash.

Led Zep Final Option disc

This particular pressing plant had all old presses, so you could change up pretty quick. We’d usually make a hundred records or so, then switch to something else. So it’s possible to get any of the early TMQ records on color, multicolor or splash vinyl. There just is no rhyme or reason for it.

Bowie In America splash

Also, on a few occasions, we’d order the whole first run, usually two hundred or so records at the time, colored, white or splashed. Later, after we shifted to the big plants, colored vinyl was no longer an option. If we ordered a hundred of a title on colored vinyl, we usually didn’t specify color. The colored vinyl at that old plant came in slabs that you heated on a hot plate, then folded, then put in the press. Each rectangular slab made one record, so it was very easy to mix the colors. Some of the hundred record run would be red, blue, green, splash or any number of colors. So as far as identification is concerned, the color of the vinyl doesn’t help. Also, I’m afraid the stamper numbers don’t help me either. If the plant had CV at the time, I asked them to use it. If they didn’t, well they didn’t. I never held up pressing a record because the plant was out of CV and I don’t think Dub did either.

Deep Purple Purple For A Day

The last things we did on colored vinyl there (if I remember right) were the two Dylan Box sets. Striptease and Toasted: the Australian Collection. We did about three hundred and fifty of each and we pressed them at the same time and we went to a lot of effort to try and make one set all green, another all red, another all blue, etc. Of course we had to mix some of the sets.

Dylan Striptease box

I know the popular belief is that we did five hundred, but back then they were specialty items and a whole bunch of trouble. It was much easier to do the color jackets then at the big plants, because we didn’t have to stuff the records. They came shrink wrapped and ready to go, so we didn’t even have to take them out of the boxes. The box sets were a whole bunch of work and at the time we didn’t think they were worth all the effort.

Much later, with a different partner, I made the mega Zeppelin box set on CV. Only a hundred of those [I believe 150 is the correct number]. My partner at the time was behind the whole thing. He hadn’t done a box set before and wasn’t aware of all the work. But to his everlasting credit, I must say we made a pretty penny off that one, so it was worth all the bother.”

Led Zep Final Option

The splash white disc image used above is one of the records from this massive set that will eventually sell for five figures in the future.

Led Zep Final Option box side

As for the matrix numbers, we didn’t think too much about that with the early ones. The guy cutting the acetate probably decided in some of the cases. Then Dub came up with the series idea. Dr. Telly wanted to only do a hundred records, starting at 1900 through 1999. I convinced him to assist me with TAKRWM which I think started at 1800. Sometimes we’d change the numbers for one reason or another.”

  • “Regular pig” vs. “smoking pig”:

It would be wrong to assume that the regular pig was Dubs only. I did many regular pigs after we split up, oftentimes I would make the same record with different labels, sometimes regular pig, sometimes smoking. Sometimes I just used whatever labels I had on hand. And Dub and I used often used stampers off the same mothers, so the records would be exactly the same. I got my pig labels and stickers the same place he got his and he got his covers the same place I got mine.

The clue as to whose record was whose might be in the rubber stamp impressions. Ten or maybe fifteen of Dub’s and my rubber stamps were exactly the same, but after we split up I went to a different place for my stamps as Dub lived in Glendale and I lived in Long Beach. There was a rubber stamp place close to where I lived, so I went there for mine. So most of the TMOQ records will be out there with slightly different rubber stamps. It would probably be hard to tell, unless you knew exactly what you were looking for, but a couple of mine had straight quotes around the title and all of Dub’s had curly quotes. However, I soon caught this and ordered new stamps with curly quotes. So if you find a “Freeze Out” or a “John Birch” with straight quotes around the title, you’ve found something rare.

If today you were to hold up one of my later Great White Wonders next to Dubs, you might see a bit of a difference in the stamp impression, but I wouldn’t be able to tell you which was which, but other than that, they were exactly the same. Very confusing, I know, but back then we were not planning on anybody caring about all this three decades later.

However, we were about making the best records possible. There never has been a perfectionist like Dub. He did his very best on every record he mastered. And I know what you mean by every record being unique, there were some I only made fifty copies of with a stamp, then did the rest in inserts, I think I did that just to confuse people. But all that said, we still never thought it would last. In fact for the longest time we thought each record would be our last. We made quick money and we spent if fast, because we were young and dumb and having a lot of fun.

From my point of view (and I’m sure Dub’s), There were no pre TMoQ records. Once Dub came up with the pig idea, we shifted the first five or six of our records over. There was nobody else before us. And until Rubber Dubber (with the exception of Norty and Ben), nobody after, except for that one Canadian guy who did that one Beatles’ record. Then, all of a sudden there was Troubled Troubadour, Herbie Howard, CBM Dave, Wooden Nickel, Liver copies galore and the floodgates were open.

I remember one time Dub and I were recording Phil Ochs at the Troubadour [Phil Ochs played at least a dozen shows there from January to February 1, 1970]. He was using the same shotgun mic he’d used to record Liver. The waitresses made sure to not walk in front of our table, kept the area between Dub’s mic and the stage clear, so as not to mess up the recording. We must have looked so official to her with our long hair and hippy clothes. I don’t have that tape anymore, wish I did.”

  • On the later years, repackaging old titles, etc.:

“Boy I’ll tell you this thread has got me to thinking about how greedy we got. Later, looking for an easy buck, we repackaged the Striptease stuff as five double record sets. Those were on black vinyl, if I remember right, because we wouldn’t have been at that old plant anymore. We also made a pretty cheesy cover that we used generically for the toasted box records (I can’t remember what it looked like, but I know it was cheesy), releasing them as five double records as well. God we were a bit slimy, repackaging that stuff over and over again. It wasn’t much fun in those later days. We were just going through the motions, trying to make money on old stampers, when it wouldn’t have been very much harder putting out something new. Lord knows, there was plenty of stuff out there.

I remember TAKRL 1900 was the Beatles live in Japan, because we did so many and we were going to start a special new label with that one. We had the rubber stamp made up and everything. But at the last minute, Dr. Telly came into the picture and Kornyphone was born. So that rubber stamp never got used (except for a couple records we sent to a guy in New York who was supposed to send them to a big account in Japan).

It was all so long ago and I seem to mostly remember the fun stuff, but it wasn’t always that way. Plus, I have to admit, I may be remembering stuff out of order, or maybe even glamorizing it a bit.

Maybe I should follow my own advice and go to some of these sites and get my facts straight, but I’m afraid if I do that, that it’ll color what I have to say. So, I guess I won’t. I’ll just keep writing it the way I remember it, without refreshing my memory with useless facts. You all will just have to remember that I am a fiction writer, and fiction writers like to tell a good story. So just take everything I say with a grain of sand.

As for your questions about various groups, if it’s not Dylan, the Beatles or the Stones, it would be info my brain has long ago flushed. And even regarding those groups, I wouldn’t know anything about stamper numbers other than what I have already posted here. I only have general knowledge, you’ll have to go elsewhere, I’m afraid, for specific knowledge. I don’t own any records anymore, or even CDs. All my music is on my hard drive. For me it was always about the music, not about the medium it was on.

Also, I will tell you that you were a bit wrong in what you told Steve about Homogenized Beatles. However, that’s a story I am going to address in one of my chapters, so you’ll have to wait on that. What Steve has is the test pressing. The first two records I did after Dub and I split were that one and the Reedy River. Steve has the test pressings for both. I was at a new plant and they didn’t know they were making bootlegs, so they naturally thought I’d want test pressings.

As far as matrix numbers and release dates, I don’t know any. And as far as what came before what, if you read through these posts you’ll see that I’ve contradicted myself on that and I probably will again. Which is true? I don’t know. Maybe neither. My posts here are about the way it coulda happened, not necessarily the way it did.

What I’m about here is the why of it all, the fun, the adventure and the downside. I’m not a collector, never was, so I don’t look at it from that kind of perspective. As I’ve said elsewhere, I’ve always considered bootlegging the same as stealing, always considered myself just a lucky crook. Our only justification was that we had no money and we wanted some. We did it for the money, me and Dub. We liked the music, sure, but we did it for the money. If we told you different, we’d be lying.

I don’t want to depreciate what I did either. We did it for the money, but it was exciting as all get out. However, you have to remember we were just kids. We thought (wrongly as it turned out) that we were breaking the law. We didn’t know we were opening the floodgates, didn’t have any sense that what we were doing was going to be important someday. Sure, we knew guys like B. Mitch Reed were playing our records and guys like Grell Marcus were writing about them, but we really thought it would all blow over. Either that, or we’d get caught by the cops and get sent up the river, which is why we were so paranoid.