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Slipped Disc Label

Vicky Vinyl had bounced back from her initial bust and kept making bootlegs. By 1978 she reissued older and pressed new releases on the Slipped Disc – Piste records, claiming to come out of France.

Slipped Disc lbl

 

“One of the reasons [Bruce Springsteen’s] 1978 Tour is so well-remembered, and often viewed as the peak of Springsteen and the E Street Band in concert, is that several complete shows were broadcast live on progressive rock and album-oriented rock radio stations. These included the July 7 show at West Hollywood’s The Roxy, broadcast on KMET, the August 9 show at Cleveland’s Agora Ballroom, broadcast on WMMS, the September 19 show at the Capitol Theatre in Passaic, New Jersey, broadcast on WNEW-FM, the September 30 show from the Fox Theatre in Atlanta, broadcast on about 20 Southeastern stations, and the December 15 show from the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, broadcast on KSAN-FM. These broadcasts were mixed by Jimmy Iovine and of high audio quality, and were listened to at the time by a larger audience than attended the concerts. ” [wikipedia – Darkness Tour]

[Springsteen] had already aired ‘Point Blank’, ‘Independance Day’, ‘The Ties That Bind’ and ‘Sherry Darling’ in widely taped radio broadcasts, which even now were being pressed to bootleg disc: something, which as of July 1978, Springsteen had insisted ‘doesn’t really bother me.’ His introduction to ‘Sandy’ [actually, it was his introduction to ‘Racing In The Street] at the December 15 Winterland show, suggesting the Jersey girls would get to hear this particularly fine version ‘through the magic of bootlegging’, rather implied he still didn’t. But by 1979 he was no longer so keen on these clandestine copyists. Or more accurately, perhaps Jon Landau on behalf of Bruce Springsteen was less keen on them. ” [Heylin in E Street Shuffle: The Glory Days of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band]

It was only logical that bootleggers were going to take Springsteen at his word and provide the magic he had spoken about at the Winterland show, full knowing all of America that cared would get to hear it. Vicky Vinyl and partner Jim Washburn started with 450 numbered copies of a 3 LP box set called LIVE IN THE PROMISED LAND, containing the complete broadcast.

Springsteen Pr Land

First edition identified by four digit numbering not going over 450, Slipped Disc labels and matrix numbers of BS2978.

Springsteen LitPLand

Surplus records from the first pressing were then issued in the beautiful gatefold sleeve with the stunning inner photo and the front saying “Winterland. 1978”.

“Actually, it is not clear if the box edition is a sort of limited edition or a cheaper package of advanced / early copies. The gatefold foldout edition is in fact more attractive than the box edition, and I guess there can be not much more than 450 around, maybe even less. So, they are both ‘originals’ in my opinion, even if for some strange reason, the box edition is considered much rarer….” [brucespringsteen.it]

Springsteen LitPLand inner

Springsteen Winterland 1978 2

Re-pressings include

Box set with insert, photo from gatefold edition

Springsteen LitPLand b

– Raring Records – Matrix BS2925, with yellow / green insert wrap and custom RR or GLC labels, black vinyl

FULL TILT or KING TOOT labels, some on red vinyl

gold / yellow vinyl with blank labels

Springsteen LitpL gold red

Springsteen Winterland copy box

Picture disc of sides 5/6, 450 copies

 

As the package obviously sold well, they then booted the Passaic, NJ recording as another triple box:

Springsteen PdRSpringsteen PdR sealed 2

Original version is a box set with a five digit numbered slip sheet with Slipped Disc labels and the matrix marking SPRING A – F. Limited to 2000 copies, so number must be up to that only.  Numbers are either stamped or found on a round or square sticker. Likely, the first copies # 1 – 200 had the numbered stickers and from then on a stamped number was used.

Springsteen PdR detail

Later edition with a higher number in a four digit format.

 

Springsteen PdR numbered box

Springsteen PdR TMoQ

Different insert. Copied inserts exist as well. Among the label variations the following exist: ‘Blockhead’, blank, Full Tilt, Side 1-6 #, the above TMOQ ‘smoking pig’ ones and more. Later re=pressings are often reported to have slight sound deterioration.

Springsteen PdR Blockhead lbl

Springsteen PdR FT lbl

These two box sets caused CBS Inc. to file charges claiming “infringements of copyrights in 43 cases, unfair competition, unjust enrichment, unauthorized use of name and likeness and interference with economic advantage” in July of 1979. The suit additionally accused Waters of producing the bootlegs Fire, “E” Ticket and Cheap Trick’s California Man 78

While Vicky Vinyl/Andrea Waters “had no time for Springsteen’s music” to quote Heylin and these box sets were just a means for her to finance more Rolling Stones releases, things were quite different for Jim Washburn, the store manager of Beggar’s Banquet – her Anaheim record store. He was a Springsteen fan and had been with Lou Cohen when Springsteen was presented with a copy of THE JERSEY DEVIL after the Santa Barbara gym concert on 1 November 1975, observing ‘The Boss’ enthusiastic reaction to having been bootlegged for the first time.

Washburn: “Throughout the course of the [1979] lawsuit, I couldn’t believe that Springsteen was behind it. He must be uninformed, this guy who was going on stage and talking … about how lawyers shouldn’t run the world. I wrote him a letter – wrapped in a rare Ronettes picture sleeve – in which I asked to meet with him, and if he still thought I’d wronged him after explaining our side, I offered to do anything I could to make it up to him. I delivered it to the desk of the Sunset Marquis in Hollywood when he was staying there, and it was promptly turned over to his attorneys, who were not terribly nice about it. Having slept on sidewalks to get Springsteen tickets and all that … I still couldn’t believe Mr. Populist Rocker had gone corporate. As the suit was winding to a close, Springsteen was again in town for a series of concerts [Springsteen played four shows at the L.A. Sports Arena, 30 October to 3 November 1980 ]. I spent all the money I had getting a room at the Sunset Marquis in the hopes of talking to him. Which I did when he showed up poolside, and he made it clear that that’s what he had lawyers for, and to leave him alone.” [Heylin, E Street Shuffle: The Glory Days of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band]

In 1981, finally nailed down on the issue in an interview by Creem magazine, Springsteen said:

“Dave Dimartino: Why did you change your opinion about bootlegs?

Bruce Springsteen: I felt that there was a point there where, when it first started, a lot of bootlegs were made by fans, there was more of a connection. But it became, there was a point where there were just so many. Just so many that it was big business. It was made by people who, you know, they didn’t care what the quality was. It just got to the point where I’d walk in and see a price tag of $30 on a record of mine that, to me, really sounded bad, and I just thought it was a rip. I thought I was getting ripped, I wrote the music, the songs – it all came out of me! And I felt it was a rip, and the people who were doing it had warehouses full of records and were just sitting back, getting fat, rushing and putting out anything and getting 30 fucking dollars for it. And I just got really mad about it at one point. “

In the end – December 1980, Waters pleaded guilty to one count of copyright infringement and was fined $5,000 for that. Awarded to Springsteen in the civil suit were 43 times $50,000 for each violated music copyright, adding up to $2,150,000 and CBS received $1,500 and court costs of $105,573. However, neither party could collect on the judgement as Waters and Washburn had already declared bankruptcy, aided by the relatively long time span between the FBI bust and CBS’ filing their civil suit for damages.

As described in Heylin’s BOOTLEG book, the FBI had had been given Water’s name several months prior already, when a Canadian retailer, Michael Mess decided to name her, Ken, Kurt Glemser and John Wizardo as the real people behind “a Long Beach bootleg ring”. A Malcolm Moore was identified as responsible for pressing the K&S titles. On 22 February 1980, the FBI and RCMP raided 150 people in the same day, from Georgia to California to Ontario, Canada, trying one and for all to stamp out this bootleg business. While some players were stopped, we know today that it did little to stem the tide. As Heylin puts it: “… the FBI failed to severe the cord between manufacturer and punter.”, and producers abroad, especially Europe and Japan were just getting started. However the bust of 1980 wiped out most of the second generation labels/producers, with the exception of Ken, who had moved to Spain by that time.

HW 7 police stamp

Canadian police evidence number stamp applied following the raid and confiscation at the Hot Wacks Press office in 1980. Item later purchased from Kurt Glemser after he received it all back.

Jim Washburn later pointed out in OC Weekly that, “despite the headlines about the $2.1 million ruling, the glut of other bootleggers’ Bruce boots was just beginning.”

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I was sent this list for the UL, dated May 1980 and the question is, could Andrea ‘Enthal’ be an alias used by Vicky Vinyl?

 

Andrea letter

061:

Genesis Lftmotm

Well, this has a ‘deluxe’ blue cover but the original release on Atlantic was reissued with one as well, so I doubt this is the K&S version. If anyone has an image of that, please leave a comment.

Previuously reviewed in its own entry under this link here

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062:

Cars El Mocambo 062

Cars El Mocambo 062 b

Side 1  Good Times Roll / Bye Bye Love  / Nightspots / My Best Friend’s Girl / Moving In Stereo    
Side 2  Since I Held You / They Won’t See You  / Don’t Cha Stop  / Just What I Needed  / Candy-O

Complete set list had two more songs:

01 – Good Times Roll
02 – Bye Bye Love
03 – Nightspots
04 – My Best Friends Girl
05 – Moving in Stereo
06 – Since I Held You
07 – Take What You Want
08 – They Won’t See You
09 – Don’t Cha Stop
10 – Just What I Needed
11 – Candy-O
12 – You’re All I ‘Ve Got Tonight

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzfRkV14AqM

There were several versions of this album, taken from a radio broadcast on 14 September 1978 (shortly before KBFH taped the band and headliner Cheap Trick at the Palladium in NYC, as released on the Audifön label/Vicky Vinyl boots THE CARS 78 and 78 CALIFORNIA MAN)

Cars El Mocambo 2

Mostly found as a stamped white LP:

Cars El Mocambo 3

Interesting text added by an eBay seller in May of 2013: “The Cars doing what they do best on stage at the El Mocambo in Toronto on Sept. 14, 1978. Stereo pro recording. If I recollect, some of these were on multi-colored vinyl, but I don’t know if this is one [ I doubt any of these exist on mcv. ]. This is a sealed, never-opened, brand spanking new copy from the Beggar’s Banquet collection, Anaheim’s long-gone “Underground” record store, boxed away for decades.”

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063:

I am aware of the YS 1600 double album with a deluxe b&w and later re-issued with a green & white cover (mostly found with yellow & tan but also with Slipped Disc labels):

 

Yes In The Round

Yes ITR

and then sides 1&2 only on the 80’s style GLC label and limited to 100 orange copies as part of the LXXXIV series (# 57)

Yes ITR GLC 2

Yes ITR # 57Yes ITR disc

but I have never seen a K&S version of this. If you have, please leave a comment.

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Numbers 064 to 069 do not seem to have been assigned.

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070: 7 LP Elvis box set that fell victim to the February 1980 raid. No further information available.

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071: The Sex Pistols vinyl bootlegs page does not list a K&S version for this release:

http://www.philjens.plus.com/pistols/pistols/pistols_bootlegs_vinyl.htm

***

072:

Rolling Stones The Trident Mixes

Rolling Stones The Trident Mixes b

A beautifully done double album with a full color cover. I would put the release date at late 1979, as it was mentioned in Innersleeve # 20, January 1980 (see below). The first issue was on black PVC.

Rolling Stones TM January 1980

Matrix: MCG/K&S 072

LP 1, side 1:
1. Jiving Sister Fanny    [03:24]
2. I’m Going Down    [03:02]
3. I Don’t Know Why    [02:08]
4. Give Me A Hamburger To Go (aka Stuck Out Alone)    [03:20]
5. Downtown Suzie    [03:49]
6. Blood Red Wine    [05:19]

Side 2:
7. Travelling Man    [06:03]
8. Family    [03:44]
9. Still A Fool    [09:59]
LP 2, side 1:
10. Family    [04:15]
11. Leather Jacket    [03:31]
12 Dancing In The Light    [02:50]
13. Potted Shrimps    [04:12]
14. So Divine (Aladdin Story)    [05:29]

Side 2:
15. And I Was A Country Boy    [04:26]
16. Who Am I?    [03:52]
17. Trident Jam    [03:43] 

 

“Jiving Sister Fanny” was recorded on July 2nd, 1969 at Olympic Studio, the day before Brian Jones died.  Two versions with different lyrics were recorded that day.  This is the rarer of the two, having appeared on some pressings of Metamorphosis while the second take appears on most pressings of the album and on the London Years.  

“I’m Going Down” was initially worked on between April 17th to July 1969 at Olympic Studio and later right before the US tour from October and November, 1969 in Los Angeles.  This take, which was also used for Metamorphosis in 1975, dates from July 14th and July 15th, 1970 at Olympic.  This track differs from the commercial version by having a false start.  This track features Bobby Keys on sax, Rocky Dijon on percussion, Stephen Stills on guitar, and Bill Plummer on upright bass.  

“Hamburger To Go” (aka “Give Me A Hamburger To Go” and “Stuck Out Alone”) dates from sessions at Olympic from March and April, 1968 and remains unreleased.  ”Downtown Susie” is a Bill Wyman tune recorded on April 23rd, 1969 at Olympic Studio and is the same as the version on Metamorphosis except is shorter at the fade by five seconds.  

“Blood Red Wine”  was recorded May, 1968 at Olympic Studio.  Jagger sings the vocals, Nicky Hopkins plays piano, and no other information is available.  It has never been released which is a shame because it is the most intriguing song in this collection.  “Travelin’ Man” is another unreleased song recorded at Olympic in October, 1970.

The first version of “Family” dates from May, 1968 in Olympic and it the arrangement with the electric guitar.  The acoustic guitar arrangement which would appear on Metamorphosis would be recorded the following month.  “Still A Fool” was recorded at the same sessions and is a ten minute jam on the Muddy Waters tune.  Jagger tries his best to sing like the blues singer too.

Six out of the last seven tracks are instrumentals.  “Leather Jacket,” recorded on June 22nd, 1970 at Olympic Studio in London, is a lighthearted and infectious pop instrumental whose sunniness is outside the pale of the Stones.  “Dancing In the Light,” dating from the spring of 1970, is another upbeat instrumental but with some recognizable Stones raunch.  “Potted Shrimp” and “Aladdin Story” come from the same time period as “Leather Jacket” but recorded at Stargroves.  “And I Was A  Country Boy” comes from the Feb.18-Mar.31 1969 sessions.

“Who Am I?” (aka “See I Love You”) is a true mystery.  It is listed on this release as being from Olympic Studio in March to May 1970.  Others sources say late 1969 and even others from Jamaica 1972 and still others claim it comes from 1963 because of its simplicity.  The best sources say it was recorded on July 14th – 15th, 1970.

The final Trident jam is another mystery.  There is no name associated with it and was never used by the band.  […] Although there are no hidden gems on this (there is a reason why many of them still reside in the vaults) but this is an interesting collection. ” [collectorsmusic.com]

 

A few years later copied in Europe on colored wax (5 different colors – green, blue, red, yellow, mcv), easily identifiable by the shorter matrix number K&S 072

Rolling Stones The Trident Mixes disc

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073:

Ferry B ANO

Ferry B ANO b

Ferry B ANO lbl

Source: 23 June 1977 (early show) – Bottom Line, New York – KBF radio broadcast. The full recording of the early and late show is on wolfgangsvault: http://www.concertvault.com/search.html?t=Bryan%20Ferry&tb=0

Side One
1 Let’s Stick Together
2 Shame, Shame, Shame
3 Road Runner
4 All Night Operator
5 Party Doll
6 You Go To My Head
7 In Your Mind

Side Two
1 Love Me Madly Again
2 Love Is The Drug
3 Tokyo Joe
4 This Is Tomorrow
5 The ‘In’ Crowd

Musicians

Bryan Ferry vocals
Chris Spedding guitar
John Wetton bass
Phil Manzanera guitar
Paul Thompson drums

Chris Mercer tenor sax
Martin Drover trumpet
Mel Collins soprano sax
Ann Odell keyboards

***

074:

Led Zeppelin 074

And the final words on the insert of the last ever K&S release are: “…in closing” – how fitting.

Side 1: Operator* / I Can’t Quit You Baby** / I Gotta Move** / Dazed & Confused**
Side 2: How Many More Times** / Travelling Riverside Blues*** / Communication Breakdown*** / Whole Lotta Love***
Recording: (*)Excellent mono soundboard; (**) (***)Excellent mono professional pre-FM soundboard radio recording.

Sources: (*)Alexis Korner and Steve Miller with Robert Plant ’68; (**)Stockholm Konserthuset, 14 March  ’69; (***)Maida Vale Studio 4 (BBC – Top Gear with John Peel), London, 24 June ’69

This master was given a second lease on life when it appeared as disc 2 of the double album release SPARE PARTS on Ken’s Phoenix Records:

Led Zep Spare Parts lbl 3

Led Zep Spare Parts lbl 4

And surprisingly as side 2 of the very rare Japanese acetate BLOW ONE’S COOL (GRASSHOPPER GH-104 A-B) (impossible to find an image of this), to pad out the partial audience recording from the infamous Milan 1971 riot show.

Pink Floyd Eclipsed XLPink Floyd Eclipsed 2Pink Floyd Eclipsed disc 2Pink Floyd Eclipsed disc 1

Matrix: 404 A – D

My friend and main go-to person for bootleg research pointed out that this number looked like the 4xx series the 70s GLC label was using (GLC 411: Rolling Stones – All Meat Music ?; GLC 412: Neil Young – Young & Old; GLC 413: Elton John – B-B-B-Benny – Live in London; GLC 415: Crosby Stills Nash and Young “we waited 3 years for this”).

Sides A+B live at the London Rainbow on 20 February 1972 and sides C+D BBC Paris Theater 30 September 1971

floydboots.com states that the above was the first issue of this double LP with just 200 copies made on orange and light blue PVC, however not everyone agrees, see the list below.

A Vicki Vinyl/Ken co-production? The sub title hints that this might be a new pressing of TAKRL’s 1903 IN CELEBRATION OF THE COMET master, which was a copy of the German bootleg Best Of Tour 72

Pink Floyd best of Tour 72 combi

It should be noted that reissues of the TAKRL release and ECLIPSED both exist with Dessie Records and Verzyl paper labels. Two of the three tracks on the second disc had previously been available on yet another early TAKRL release: # 1913: NOCTURNAL SUBMISSION : ROBOT LOVE but Hot Wacks claims this was a copy of Contraband’s Floyds Of London

Pink Floyd Floyds of London v1 3

floydboots states that this does exist with a deluxe cover in a rare variation. If anyone has a good image of this, do leave a comment. The matrix number changed later to ECL 1-4:

Pink Floyd Eclipsed gre blu

I found the following list during my research but it clearly has to be taken with a pinch of salt. Unless you were there or one of the associates kept notes and they are available, it is very hard to say. which insert color was the genuine first issue.

1) 404 A-D. First pressing, big yellow insert cover, original yellow/white “Ruthless Rhymes” labels.

2) 404 A-D. First pressing, green (record 1) & blue (record 2) vinyl, 100 made, big red insert cover with stamp imprint, original yellow/white “Ruthless Rhymes” labels.

3) 404 A-D. First pressing, blue (record 1) and orange (record 2) vinyl, 200 made, big red insert cover with stamp imprint, original yellow/white “Ruthless Rhymes” labels.

4) 404 A-D. First pressing, big white/brown insert cover, record 1 with white label, record 2 with green label.

Pink Floyd Eclipsed whi

5) ECL 1-4. Second pressing, little yellow insert cover, white label.

6) ECL 1-4. Multicoloured vinyl, 50 made, little yellow insert cover with sticker, black/white cartoon labels. This also exists on black PVC.

Pink Floyd EclipsedPink Floyd Eclipsed blPink Floyd Eclipsed dark

7) RUTHLESS RHYMES GLC 404 A-D. Third pressing, green/blue vinyl, 100 numbered edition, big brown insert cover, silver/red “GLC” labels.

8) RUTHLESS RHYMES GLC 404 A-D. “Raring Record” labels.

9) LXXXIV Series #54, reissue of the “Ruthless Rhymes” edition, green/blue vinyl, 100 numbered edition copies.

***

Missing from the above list are pressings made with Slipped Disc, yellow RECORD 1/2 and Dessie Records labels – “RE-ISSUED AGAIN ON THE ‘DESSIE RECORDS’ LABEL USING NEW PLATES (MATRIX NUMBER – DESSIE A/D GR L-29708).”:

Pink Floyd Eclipsed SD

Pink Floyd Eclipsed yel lblPink Floyd Eclipsed Dessie

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Auction results for this title vary quite a bit, with the colored Ruthless Rhymes and LXXXIV versions selling for as much as $500 and the MCV/Verzyl versions even close to $1200 but all other versions hovering around the $50+ mark.

This release has been copied in Europe several times with deluxe covers (copying the tree lady art work on the back) and box sets referred to by a color.

****

Jimi Hendrix ‘BROADCASTS – Maui

Hendrix Broadcasts Maui red blu

Reissue of this classic TMoQ combo 7502 and about the third incarnation and also the third on colored wax. Also exists in red & green and with blank labels.

***

ditto ‘LIVE AT THE L.A. FORUM 4-26-70‘ “SCUSE ME…” version

Hendrix Live LA Forum blu gree

Back in the day, many bootleggers issued this title, Rubber Dubber, Munia, TMoQ, … it was even available as a series of four 7″ records. The insert originally showed an image of Jimi’s head but a dark spot appeared on the Hen and TMOQ versions and more rounds of copying the copy transformed it into something looking like an expressionist art piece.

 

Hendrix Live LA Forum clear insertHendrix Live LA Forum mcvThe splatter/mcv discs are usually found with Mushroom label designated packages but not in this case.

Hendrix LatLAFo mcv 2

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Jethro Tull ‘MESS

Jethro Tull Flute Cake mcvJethro Tull MessTwo different reissues of this early TMoQ title recorded by Dub Taylor shortly after Led Zeppelin’s Blueberry Hill performance.

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ROLLING STONES ‘(in exotic) “HONOLULU“‘

Rolling Stones Honolulu RR lblRolling Stones Honolulu cvRolling Stones Honolulu cv 2

A reissue of Pig’s Eye # 09

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ditto ‘SUMMER RERUNS’

Rolling Stones Summer Reruns red blu RRRolling Stones Summer Reruns red blu RR 1Rolling Stones Summer Reruns red blu RR 2

Rolling Stones Summer Reruns red blu RR CECV

Originally out as TMoQ 72011

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Frank Zappa ‘METAL MAN HAS HORNETS WINGS’

Originally on Wizardo Records – WRMB 365

Zappa MMHHW yellowZappa MMHHW yellow 2

****

And two example of stamps with different fonts (the second example may not even be a stamp and may have been produced significantly later):

Dylan LMDIMFS

Zappa 200 Motels stamp

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I’m probably missing a few. If you know of any others, do leave a comment.

Genesis LftMotMonsterGenesis LftMotM bAlso exists with blank and red labels or with a blue tinted cover and the “Atlantis Records” labels (made up to go with the back cover logo) seen here:

Genesis LftMotM blu

And as part of the ‘MULTI COLOURED VINYL’ sticker series:

Genesis LftMotMonster

Genesis LftMotMonster disc 1Genesis LftMotMonster disc 2

When Genesis revisited Chicago on their extended “…And Then There Were Three” Tour, it was decided to play at a smaller venue with better acoustics and the Uptown Theatre was chosen. Local radio station WXRT received permission to record the show for broadcast, one of only three radio recordings made during this tour.

Complete set list:

01 Crowd Noise
00:49
02 Eleventh Earl Of Mar
09:07
03 In The Cage
08:15
04 Burning Rope
08:20
05 Dancing With The Moonlit Knight
05:06
06 The Musical Box (Closing Section)
03:52
07 Ripples
10:23
08 Deep In The Motherlode
07:26
09 One For The Vine
10:52
10 Squonk
06:44
11 Say It’s Alright Joe
10:02
12 The Lady Lies
07:16
13 Romeo & Juliet Story
04:01
14 The Cinema Show / … In That Quiet Earth
11:26
15 Afterglow
04:56
16 Follow You, Follow Me
04:32
17 Dance On A Volcano
04:15
18 Drum Duet
01:30
19 Los Endos
06:35
20 I Know What I Like
09:12
21 After Show Interview With Phil
07:36

***

“The Uptown had been showing second-run movies when Jam began booking rock shows there. The list of performers is impressive: The Grateful Dead for six three-night stands between 1978 and 1981; Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band for three shows in 1978 and 1980; Bob Marley and the Wailers for dates in […] 1978 and 1979; Frank Zappa for four visits (and five shows) between 1977 and 1981; Cheap Trick opening for the Kinks in 1977; Genesis and Peter Gabriel playing six days apart in October 1978; and Prince opening for Rick James in early 1980 and headlining later that year.

Even now, one of the well-worn seat backs in the dusty auditorium boasts a Grateful Dead bumper sticker that reads, “Warning, I Brake for Hallucinations.” In the oval ladies lounge, these words remain scrawled: “Springsteen is God.”

Uptown_seat_backs

But the rock bookings and movie screenings couldn’t keep the theater — owned by the Plitt movie theater chain and, for much of Jam’s time there, a local theater operator named Rene Rabiela — from falling into disrepair and eventual insolvency. The heat was shut off, and in winter 1982 the pipes burst, flooding the basement and causing extensive damage to ceilings, walls and staircases that has yet to be repaired.” [Chicago Tribune, October 11, 2011]

****

This Slipped Disc bootleg seems to be the only vinyl bootleg pressed from an Uptown Theater performance but it certainly helped establish a place in bootleg history for this grand old theater.

Other recordings made at the Uptown:

– HAWKWIND – Uptown Theater,Chicago,Il. November 26,1973 incomplete aud. recording Vg+

– MARSHALL TUCKER BAND – May 5 1977 Uptown Theater Chicago (FM)

Uptown MTB

– GRATEFUL DEAD – Feb 1, 1978 ***SOUNDBOARD***

– GRATEFUL DEAD – 1978-05-16&17

– BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN –  September 6, 1978

– FRANK ZAPPA—– SEPTEMBER 29th 1978

– GRATEFUL DEAD – November 18, 1978   * SBD *

– BOB MARLEY & THE WAILERS – 1979-11-13  VIDEO

– GRATEFUL DEAD 1979-12-03/04/05  [SBD]

– BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN 1980-10-11

– KANSAS – 1980-10-28 *FM* [1 song has now seen an official release]

– FRANK ZAPPA—– NOVEMBER 28 + 29TH 1980

– GRATEFUL DEAD –  2-26/27/28-81

– JERRY GARCIA BAND 1981-11-17  Early and Late Show

***

Concerts at the Uptown:

Hawkwind – 26 November1973

The Tubes – 31 October 1975

Bay City Rollers – 27 August 1976                               Concert announcement in the Daily Herald from that day:

BCR UptownImages here: http://uptownhistory.compassrose.org/2011/05/1976-bay-city-rollers-concert-uptown.html

BCR Uptown

Bay City Rollers at the Uptown Theathre August 27, 1976.

.

 

Boston w. Jim Peterik – 3 October 1976

The Kinks w. Cheap Trick – 12 February 1977
Kinks Uptown
ELO w. Steve Hillage – 26, 27, 28 February 1977

ELO Uptown

Peter Gabriel – 11 March 1977

Utopia – 18 March 1977

Procol Harum – 1 May 1977

Marshall Tucker Band – 5 May 1977

Foreigner – 14 May 1977

Foreigner – 30 September 1977

Thin Lizzy – 5 November 1977   http://www.thinlizzyguide.com/tours/dates/1977/771105.htm

Gentle Giant – 20 November 1977

The Ramones – 20 January 1978

Grateful Dead – 30, 31 January + 1 February 1978

Grateful Dead – 17 May 1978

Bob Marley & The Wailers – 27 May 1978

Marley B Uptown T 78

Photo taken by Paul Natkin for the Chicago Tribune

Bruce Springsteen – 6 September 1978

Frank Zappa – 29 September 1978

Zappa Uptown

Genesis – 13, 14 October 1978

Genesis Chicago 13.10.78

Peter Gabriel – 19 October 1978 [the 14 December ’78 edition of Rolling Stone ran a concert review of the Genesis & Peter Gabriel shows at the Uptown]

RS-review-Dec-78

Grateful Dead – 16-18 November 1978
GDead Uptown 78 stub

Utopia – 5 January 1979

Roxy Music – 6 April 1979

The Allman Brothers Band – 23, 24 May 1979

Bob Marley & The Wailers – 13 November 1979

Grateful Dead – 3-5 December 1979

Rick James w. Prince – 28, 29 February 1980

Peter Gabriel – 26 June 1980

“I was a high school senior in June of 1980. Tom, Dave, and I had scored tickets to see Peter Gabriel at the Uptown Theater. This was the “Melt” tour; the show  would feature the recently released third solo album.

We arrived at the Uptown Theater and climbed a wide, carpeted staircase to reach our first row, first balcony seats. At the far end of the first balcony lobby was a small bar tended by a waiter with a vest and bow tie. Deciding to take the risk, I approached and ordered three beers. The beers were poured. I paid. I brought them to our seats. I repeated this process several times. We were ecstatic: Uptown Theater, first row, first balcony, bouncing beers and waiting to see Peter Gabriel.

So I’m in the aisle seat. The house lights go off and there’s that magical anticipation: nothing but the red lights on the amps shining into the darkness.

At this point, a strange character walks down the balcony stairs and stands right next to me. His head is shaved, completely bald. He’s wearing a dark blue sweatsuit with white stripes down each sleeve. I remember thinking, Peter Gabriel can bring out some weird dudes. Then out of nowhere comes an incredibly bright blast of light. I look to my left, and this bald guy is waving a massive hand-held spotlight. He’s spraying the theater with this light. Almost immediately, I noticed other people throughout the theater dressed in the same sweatsuits doing the same with their spotlights.

I turn back to my left to take a closer look at this bald guy. He looks directly at me. He points the beam upward to illuminate his face.

It’s Peter Gabriel.

I leap out of my seat. “It’s Peter Gabriel! You’re Peter Gabriel!” I’m grabbing for Dave and Tom jumping up and down and then I put each one of my hands on each one of Peter Gabriel’s shoulders. The only thing I can say is, “You’re Peter Gabriel! You’re Peter Gabriel!” over and over. He stares at me, expressionless, then slowly, deliberately, starts walking backward out of my reach and back up the balcony stairs.

Meanwhile, all the other beams are making their way to the stage. It’s the band; each member has been positioned around the theater.

The show was fantastic. This was the first tour that included “Biko,” the entire theater was bellowing out the chorus to the song. I remember reading a later quote from Peter Gabriel saying that the Uptown Theater reaction to Biko had brought tears to his eyes.” [by Mike Landreth]

Grateful Dead – 19-21 August 1980

The Kinks w. Angel City – 17 September 1980

Bruce Springsteen – 10, 11 October 1980

Kansas – 28, 29 October 1980

Frank Zappa – 28, 29 November 1980

Prince – 26 December 1980

1980-12-19 Prince

Elvis Costello & The Attractions – 17 January 1981

Grateful Dead – 26-28 February 1981

Alice Cooper – 5 August 1981

Jerry Garcia Band – 17 November 1981

Frank Zappa – 27 November 1981

1981-11-27 Frank Zappa Chicago

J. Geils Band w. Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes – 19 December 1981

uptown-theatre-wide

Devo SF posterDevo SF ticket 78

01 Wiggly World
02 Pink Pussycat
03 Satisfaction
04 Too Much Paranoias
05 Praying Hands
06 Uncontrollable Urge
07 Mongoloid
08 Jocko Homo
09 Smart Patrol / Mr. DNA
10 Sloppy
11 dj chat 1
12 Come Back Jonnee
13 Gut Feeling >
14 Slap Your Mammy
15 Devo Corporate Anthem                                                                                                                                    16 dj chat 2
17 Red Eye
18 The Words Get Stuck In My Throat
19 dj chat 3

Track 11 was later officially released by the band on a flexi disc as “Flimsy Wrap” and sold with the picture disc edition of their official LP Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!

Devo Flimsy Wrap

Two images taken at this show and others from different dates can be found here: http://www.mypixrock.com/index.php?category=gallery/punk/devo&start=0

***

DE-4000 on Slipped Disc label

Devo VtDNudistCNYDevo VtDNudistCNY detail

Released in 1979. Not the first DEVO bootleg – that honor seems to belong to WORKFORCE on Cyber Records. Compared to the complete set list, omits all dj chat and tracks 05 Praying Hands, 14 Slap Your Mammy, 15 Devo Corporate Anthem and 17 Red Eye but adds a demo for “Secret Agent Man”.  

“In 1974, the song was recorded by Devo and again in 1979 on the Duty Now for the Future album with a jerky, heavily modified arrangement and significantly altered lyrics (sung by guitarist Bob Mothersbaugh). The 1974 recording was featured as a music video in Devo’s independent short film, In The Beginning Was The End: The Truth About De-Evolution. The song was a favorite of Devo fans, entering the setlist in 1977 and remaining until 1980 (and returned to the band’s setlist in 2006). ” [wikipedia]

***

Devo HtkaDbfhDevo HtkaDbfh b

Small print says “Back sleeve states:  “Contains 7 songs unreleased at the time of this printing including ‘Secret Agent Man’ which as intended as a 45 rpm but never released. Created and distributed by the DEVO Fan Club, Manchester, England 1979 “

I do remember this line being used in the run out space of Idle Mind bootlegs, just with “Black Sabbath” substituted as the band.

Matrix: DE 4000-A/B [I suspect identical to …DEVO Nudist Camp… ]

***

Devo LiSF adv c

I have seen this described as having material from San Francisco 1977 and being a Japanese bootleg made in 1981 but that seems to be incorrect. The number SX-TT 979 that is sometimes used to identify this release is meaningless as all Slipped Disc paper labels include that number:

Slipped Disc lbl

****

Copy of devo Workforce b

devo Workforce aIndividually numbered insert sheet (not in relation to actually produced copies though).

Devo Workforce-bDEVO Workforce label

One of the few bootleg albums that did not mention the band’s name even on the outside of the package, quite unusual for a non-established artist.

Review from a fan site:  “This live bootleg tries to look as official as possible and I think they did a great job with the packaging which includes a single sided inner with lyrics, an interesting little diagram on the back and full colour artwork on the front… but obviously they didn’t want to raise too much suspicion so there is no mention of Devo anywhere on the release, instead the record is created to Workforce To The World… hmm… I kind of like this live set but it isn’t anything particularly special, definitely for completists only. The recording is taken from a gig in San Fransisco with the addition of two track recorded in Devo’s native Ohio. I’m not sure whether this and the other Devo bootleg are from before or after the release of Q: Are We Not Men? but I’m tempted to say before.”

****

DEVO INNOCENT SPUDSDEVO INNOCENT SPUDS b

Most certainly taken from the following radio tapes:

DEVO
August 3, 1977
Mabuhay Gardens
San Francisco, CA

DISC #1/2 (39:30)
—————–
EARLY SET
01) Satisfaction (cut)
02) Too Much Paranoias
03) Praying Hands
04) Uncontrollable Urge
05) Mongoloid
06) Jocko Homo (cut)
07) Smart Patrol
08) Mr. DNA
09) Gut Feeling
10) Sloppy

DISC #2/2 (44:51)
—————–
LATE SET
01) Satisfaction
02) Too Much Paranoias
03) Praying Hands
04) Uncontrollable Urge
05) Mongoloid
06) Smart Patrol
07) Mr. DNA
08) Gut Feeling
09) Slap Your Mammy
10) Sloppy
11) Jocko Homo
12) Clockout

This is often labeled as 8/5/1977, but the leading DEVO chroniclers online have re-labeled it as 8/3.

There is an obvious difference difference in the recording quality between the early and late sets, but each is mixed very evenly. I’d say the Late Set is the better quality of the two. The vocals are right up front and every instrument is audible and clear.”

DEVO early-backstageBackstage at Mabuhay Gardens

DEVO Mabuhay GardensSF Mabuhay G

Hard to imagine a time in San Francisco when art didn’t clash with $$$ and the cash won. This had already faded the first time I visited the city in September of 1988 and even more so in early 1994 when I moved there. These days,  a 2 BR near Valencia St. in the Mission can be offered for $4K, prices I previously only knew from the Marina, one of the cities most expensive neighborhoods.

Was it really better musically in the late 1970s (for those born in the early 60’s) or is that just a BOF perspective? A question I keep asking myself with each new post.

***

Can U Take It?

DEVO True bio cytiDEVO True bio cyti b

“…Rubber Robot Records — a label that devoted itself to Devo bootlegs exclusively.”This is actually not correct, while RR # 003 is Sing if You’re Glad To Be Devo/Devonia RR # 002 is Elvis Costello “THE LAST FOXTROT”.

http://devo-obsesso.com/html/12in-boots.html

***

I am not sure which of these two came first but they contain the same material:

You Can Take It!

DEVO YCTIDEVO YCTI b

The first three tracks on B are studio recordings. I’d dare a guess that the live tracks come from the Old Waldorf KSAN broadcast, which would date both releases to early 1979.

Clapton Snowhead

Also found with Slipped Disc and blank white labels.

Source: KBFH compilation of Eric’s second Santa Monica Civic show on February 12, 1978 plus one track (“Sign Language”) from their Dallas, TX – 15 November 1976 partial recording.

Wolfgangsvault has the following master tapes in its archives:

Dallas Convention Center (Dallas, TX) November 15, 1976

    1 Hello Old Friend 03:57
    2 Sign Language 03:57
    3 Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door 05:51
    4 Blues Power 12:13
    5 Crowd 00:42
    6 Layla 12:33

 

Santa Monica Civic Auditorium (Santa Monica, CA), February 12, 1978

    1 Crowd 00:48
    2 Medley: Peaches And Diesel / Wonderful Tonight 04:51
    3 Wonderful Tonight 04:01
    4 Lay Down Sally 05:25
    5 Next Time You See Her 04:34
    6 The Core 09:12
    7 We’re All The Way 03:07
    8 She’s In Love With A Rodeo Man 03:26
    9 Fool’s Paradise 04:16
    10 Cocaine 07:14
    11 Badge 08:35
    12 Double Trouble 06:29
    13 Interlude 01:00
    14 Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out 04:48
    15 Let It Rain 07:15
    16 Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door 05:43
    17 Last Night 04:16
    18 Layla 06:52
    19 Crowd 02:29
    20 Bottle Of Red Wine 04:49
    21 Interlude 00:40
    22 You’ll Never Walk Alone 04:02

Eric Clapton – guitar, vocals
Dick Sims – keyboards
George Terry – guitar
Carl Radle – bass, vocals
Marcy Levy – vocals
Jaime Oldacker – drums

 

Comments:

“This may be – in terms of the number of different releases – the most-circulated Clapton recording among collectors.  This is with good reason, as it’s a good show! Over the years many incomplete versions of this performance were traded among collectors, and then among the first Clapton ROIO released on vinyl [I would disagree though that Snowhead was one of the first Clapton vinyl bootlegs], then on some of the very first Clapton CD ROIO releases.”

” “The Core”, and the blues medley (“Going Down Slow”, and “Ramblin’ On My Mind”) from this performance were later released as part of the “Crossroads 2: Live in the Seventies” box set. If you listen and compare, it’s clear that the officially released versions are remixed – it’s a shame they dole out bits and pieces instead of the whole show! Still, this is a neat one and a personal favorite.  Of note, EC instrumentals are rare enough in concert, but to open a show with one and then segue into one of the few truly er, wonderful, versions of “Wonderful Tonight” is a real treat.”

After TWENTY/TWENTY HINDSIGHT (on TAKRL) there was RETROSPECTIVE FORESIGHT

Nazz RF

Nazz RetroFores Rec 1

Also available on Dragonfly and Slipped Disc

Nazz RetroFores bl

Nazz 16 mag 68

Cover art inspiration, 16 Magazine, Fall 1968 issue

Who actually plays on these tracks seems to be a bit in dispute:

       He Was (not by Nazz, but by the band “Great Imposters”)
        Some People (original version on III)
        Ready I Am (not otherwise available) (not by Nazz, but by the band “Great Imposters”)
        Kicks (original version on III)
        But I Ain’t Got You (not otherwise available) (not by Nazz, but by the band “Great Imposters”)
        Take The Hand (original version on III)
        Lemming Song (original version on I)
        Open My Eyes (live) (original version on I)  (not by Nazz, but by the band “Great Imposters”)
        Chrisopher Columbus (original version on III)
        Train Kept A-Rollin’ (demo version – first release on Best Of Nazz)

***

“This LP containes 2 kinds of tapes,post-NAZZ demo tape recorded by Rick Nielson and official NAZZ III recording. Demo is horrible mono recordings and regular NAZZ III is excellent stereo.

Side one: He Was(also titled “Bean” said Rick,demo),Some People,Ready I am(demo,”So good to see you” later recording on Cheap Trick first LP),Kicks,But I Ain’t Got You(wrote by Rick),Take The Hand

Side Two: Lemming Song(demo,early NAZZ era),You Are My Window,Open My Eyes(live track,bad condition,not NAZZ by Move),Christopher Columbus,Train Kept Rolling(demo,from acetate,also included on “best of nazz” LP)”

***

“… it has been reported that the live numbers that were used here weren’t even recorded by the Nazz but by the Sickman of Europe, a group that I guess (correct me if I’m wrong, gently!) featured not only former Nazz member Thom Mooney but future Cheap Trick Rick Nielsen amongst perhaps others Tricksters (I believe Tom Petterson was in there as well).  The weird thing about the Sickman of Europe name is that it was used in the eighties after Cheap Trick’s fame had eventually deep-sixed and Petterson and perhaps Nielsen dug it up for a go ’round in a new combo which I doubt had the rest of the original members.  The data regarding this group is still sketchy and I’m sure adds to the confusion for anyone doing a Pete Frame-styled family tree. Even more puzzling for me is why would two guys who were in a major league rock group have to start from the bottom only a few short years later playing the club circuit in hope of another big chance in the limelight?  I guess this music biz is a lot tougher than I had imagined! If you do want to hear the Sickman of Europe in their original state they might actually be on here and if that is them then they sure were as hard-edged pop rock good as the band they eventually morphed into! (I didn’t want to bring this up since it would only add to more confusion, but the Mooney-era Sickman used to bill themselves as the Nazz whenever they’d hit Philly which is perhaps why they are on this album to begin with. I’m sure that the bootleggers themselves weren’t too sure either, and who knows even at this late date which is what!).” [http://black2com.blogspot.de/2009/11/only-thing-missing-is-incense-used-to.html]

“… As Sick Man of Europe, they recorded a number of demos which have since turned up on a bootleg album, Retrospective Foresight, as a collection of Nazz out-takes, although most of the tracks actually aren’t. It actually features Nazz III tracks, a live take of “Open My Eyes” that Stewkey thinks might be the Texan Nazz, and rough takes of “Lemming Song” and “Train Kept a ‘Rollin’.” The Sick Man of Europe tunes on the record are “I Ain’t Got You” (a Stewkey original), “He Was” (another Stewkey comp), and Nielsen’s “So Good to See You” (billed there as “Ready I Am”).”