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Vicki Vinyl

Deep Purple Get It While It Tastes

Deep Purple Get It While It Tastes b

I have also found these picture labels on a Japanese blog. Does that mean there was a first pressing perhaps that used these?

Deep Purple Get It While It Tastes lbl a

Deep Purple Get It While It Tastes lbl b

Deep Purple’s last night of their AustralAsia tour live at the Budokan, 15 December 1975

The official multi-track recorder was running backstage to capture material for yet another Japan only live album (to be released March 1977 as Last Concert In Japan, the 1985 31 minute video compilation Rises Over Japan and finally upgraded and including the full show in 2001 as This Time Around: Live in Tokyo ) while recorders were running in the audience as well. Apart from the person taping the source that ended up on GET IT WHILE IT TASTES, Mr. Peach also attended this show and his much better recording was released by Tarantura in 2010 as Made In Tokyo (making it the second recording of an already officially released concert among his tapes, his Cheap Trick capture being the other one).

It looks like Marc released this LP around the early summer of 1976, beating the official album comfortably, although lacking in the fidelity department.

“In a 1995 interview, Glenn Hughes calls Last Concert in Japan an “awful record,” and says that it “should never have been released” because “Tommy couldn’t play.” “

Side 1:  Burn / Lady Luck / Love Child / Smoke On The Water / Wild Dogs                                                  Side 2:  I Need Love-Soldier Of Fortune / You Keep On Moving / Stormbringer / Highway Star

The set list:

Burn
Lady Luck
Love Child
Gettin’ Tighter
Smoke On The Water
Wild Dogs
I Need Love
Soldier Of Fortune
Keyboard Solo
Lazy (incl. Drum Solo)
Owed To ‘G’
This Time Around
Guiter Solo
Drifter
You Keep On Moving
Stormbringer

Highway Star

***

Vicky Vinyl must have gotten hold of this title around the same time as MARC’s Suzi Quatro release – 1977, I would guess:

 

Deep Purple Made For Japan redDeep Purple Made For Japan red bDeep Purple Made for Japan blueDeep Purple Made for Japan yelDeep Purple Made for Japan SM Pig

Apart from “Stormbringer”, the bootleg and the official LP selected the same tracks.

Deep Purple-Lyrics-Jap Pressing

 

Deep P 75 Budokan

 

****

Deep Purple fans must be among the least shy to stick a bootleg under an original member’s nose and ask to have it signed:

Deep Purple Get It While It Tastes signed

Deep Purple GiwiT signed

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Springsteen Jersey Devil

Springsteen Jersey Devil b

 

Matrix writing: HAR 147 and either THIS SIDE IS FOR CHAR – THIS SIDE IS FOR CAROL

Springsteen Jersey Devil lbl

Lou had two cassettes of live recordings taped back East (not all songs complete) and he turned this into the world’s first Springsteen bootleg. Here are the sources for tracks 2 – 8:
“The FM version circulated on boot vinyl in the 70’s: you can tell it’s broadcast cuz the station edited Bruce’s rap before #6 (deleted reference to the alcoholic and other odd characters); I believe other raps were also snipped, either for legal reasons or for time constraints.

Bruce Springsteen & E Street Band
The Main Point
Bryn Mawr, PA US
April 24, 1973

Bold tracks are on the LP

1. New York City Song aka New York City Seranade aka Jazzman
2. Circus Song aka Wild Billy’s Circus Song
3. Sprit in the Night
4. Does This Bus Stop at 82nd Street?
5. Hey Santa Anna aka Contessa aka Santa Anna
6. Tokyo aka And Then The Band Played aka And The Band Played
7. Thundercrack

The last track on side 2 comes from a WMMR broadcast from the same venue on 5 February 1975 with the beginning taken from the official Born To Run album, since the taper missed the start of ‘Thunder Road’.

 

Originals have this silver label, listing the titles for both sides – later pressings left out ‘Thunder Road’ – the other side usually had a blank label or an Idle Mind logo label. brucespringsteen.it claimed these were pressed on black, red and multi-color PVC but all the red ones I have seen where red and multicolored:

Springsteen Jersey Devil red mcv

Inserts / mini-catalogs further help date copies by what dates and releases are mentioned. The Italian Springsteen website has four of them. Here is the second earliest insert as a significant upgrade:

HAR catalogue

****

From eBay auction texts:

“BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN THE ROXY 75 2LP FANTASTIC CONDITION(INSERT IS LOOSE)THIS IS THE RAREST AND MOST SOUGHT AFTER IDLE MIND PRODUCTION TITLE AND COMES COMPLETE WITH CATALOG.200 COPIES .ONLY VERSSION OR FORM BY IDLE MIND(YOU SEE THE DIFFERNECE IN THE LABEL AND IN THE INSERT PHOTO(THE DIFFERENCE IS THAT IN THE HAR EDITION NI IMP 1105 WAS STATED IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT OF THE INSERT).VERY RARE

REMARKS:THIS IS ONE OF THE 4-5 RAREST LIVE ABOUT THE BOSS IN THIS FROM”

“bruce springsteen the roxy imp1105

this is by far the rarest bruce spring steen item even more than ain’t nobody here multicolor wax and box o’ rocks 1st edition.

also as idle mind production ths is by far the rarest even more than led zeppelin my brain huts on green vinyl

both cover(insert not glued)and vinyl are near mint, label is the same [as] my brain hurts(white label without any imp logo)

the H.A.R version is on black or multicolor vinyl with yellow H.A.R label the I.M.P. VERSION IS ON BLUE AND YELLOW  WAX AND IS THEREFORE DOUBT VERY,VERY RARE”

Springsteen The Roxy ora blu

 

Bruce Springsteen & The E street Band
1975-10-17a (early Show)
The Roxy Theater, Hollywood, CA
Radio Broadcast

A release where Lou felt he had to set the record straight in a latter to Kurt Glemser in regards to Vicky Vinyl’s actual involvement. The “cut up a poster that would now be worth $500” for the artwork – insert.

Also, with HAR labels. Matrix has the following phrases: 1: “Bruce I Want Your Billboard”; Side 2: “This Side For Melinda”; Side 3: “This Side For Sean & Mark”; Side 4: “Catch Me If You Can -V.V.”

Some inserts have “IMP 1005” added under the dangling shoes.

Springsteen 160 TANHFBT IMP lbl

Springsteen 160 TANHFBT green. ora

Springsteen 160 TANHFBT

Also in red & orange and two different greens:

Springsteen 160 green x 2****

Dylan Young Snack

Dylan Snack b2

Dylan Young Snack disc

Dylan Snack or discSo far I have found these two colored and label versions shown above. Re-pressings were on black wax.

Matrix (Side A: VIBE #160-A): “Dedicated To These Few People Who Truly Understand Me”
Matrix (Side B: VIBE #160-B): “For Love And Dave”

“Although the snack concert was a broadcast event, Dylan’s microphone was having problems and he is not as loud as he needs to be. ” [bobsboots.com]

****

bob-dylan-basics-in-g-minor

Matrix: 1900 EP SIDE 1 DYLAN FOR PRES IN 76
Matrix: 1900 EP SIDE 2 NEIL FOR VP

bobsboots states originally released on red PVC:

Dylan Bigm red

Each side features 2 excerpts from  the Mary Travers interview 3 October 1975. In another continuation (after the typical matrix messages) the songs are from the 1964 Philharmonic Hall Helloween Show. The last track is not by Bob Dylan but taken from an official 45 by The Family Frog: 

Family Frog Help

Vicky Vinyl had bounced back from her initial bust and kept making bootlegs. By 1978 she reissued older and pressed new releases on the Slipped Disc – Piste records, claiming to come out of France.

Slipped Disc lbl

 

“One of the reasons [Bruce Springsteen’s] 1978 Tour is so well-remembered, and often viewed as the peak of Springsteen and the E Street Band in concert, is that several complete shows were broadcast live on progressive rock and album-oriented rock radio stations. These included the July 7 show at West Hollywood’s The Roxy, broadcast on KMET, the August 9 show at Cleveland’s Agora Ballroom, broadcast on WMMS, the September 19 show at the Capitol Theatre in Passaic, New Jersey, broadcast on WNEW-FM, the September 30 show from the Fox Theatre in Atlanta, broadcast on about 20 Southeastern stations, and the December 15 show from the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, broadcast on KSAN-FM. These broadcasts were mixed by Jimmy Iovine and of high audio quality, and were listened to at the time by a larger audience than attended the concerts. ” [wikipedia – Darkness Tour]

[Springsteen] had already aired ‘Point Blank’, ‘Independance Day’, ‘The Ties That Bind’ and ‘Sherry Darling’ in widely taped radio broadcasts, which even now were being pressed to bootleg disc: something, which as of July 1978, Springsteen had insisted ‘doesn’t really bother me.’ His introduction to ‘Sandy’ [actually, it was his introduction to ‘Racing In The Street] at the December 15 Winterland show, suggesting the Jersey girls would get to hear this particularly fine version ‘through the magic of bootlegging’, rather implied he still didn’t. But by 1979 he was no longer so keen on these clandestine copyists. Or more accurately, perhaps Jon Landau on behalf of Bruce Springsteen was less keen on them. ” [Heylin in E Street Shuffle: The Glory Days of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band]

It was only logical that bootleggers were going to take Springsteen at his word and provide the magic he had spoken about at the Winterland show, full knowing all of America that cared would get to hear it. Vicky Vinyl and partner Jim Washburn started with 450 numbered copies of a 3 LP box set called LIVE IN THE PROMISED LAND, containing the complete broadcast.

Springsteen Pr Land

First edition identified by four digit numbering not going over 450, Slipped Disc labels and matrix numbers of BS2978.

Springsteen LitPLand

Surplus records from the first pressing were then issued in the beautiful gatefold sleeve with the stunning inner photo and the front saying “Winterland. 1978”.

“Actually, it is not clear if the box edition is a sort of limited edition or a cheaper package of advanced / early copies. The gatefold foldout edition is in fact more attractive than the box edition, and I guess there can be not much more than 450 around, maybe even less. So, they are both ‘originals’ in my opinion, even if for some strange reason, the box edition is considered much rarer….” [brucespringsteen.it]

Springsteen LitPLand inner

Springsteen Winterland 1978 2

Re-pressings include

Box set with insert, photo from gatefold edition

Springsteen LitPLand b

– Raring Records – Matrix BS2925, with yellow / green insert wrap and custom RR or GLC labels, black vinyl

FULL TILT or KING TOOT labels, some on red vinyl

gold / yellow vinyl with blank labels

Springsteen LitpL gold red

Springsteen Winterland copy box

Picture disc of sides 5/6, 450 copies

 

As the package obviously sold well, they then booted the Passaic, NJ recording as another triple box:

Springsteen PdRSpringsteen PdR sealed 2

Original version is a box set with a five digit numbered slip sheet with Slipped Disc labels and the matrix marking SPRING A – F. Limited to 2000 copies, so number must be up to that only.  Numbers are either stamped or found on a round or square sticker. Likely, the first copies # 1 – 200 had the numbered stickers and from then on a stamped number was used.

Springsteen PdR detail

Later edition with a higher number in a four digit format.

 

Springsteen PdR numbered box

Springsteen PdR TMoQ

Different insert. Copied inserts exist as well. Among the label variations the following exist: ‘Blockhead’, blank, Full Tilt, Side 1-6 #, the above TMOQ ‘smoking pig’ ones and more. Later re=pressings are often reported to have slight sound deterioration.

Springsteen PdR Blockhead lbl

Springsteen PdR FT lbl

These two box sets caused CBS Inc. to file charges claiming “infringements of copyrights in 43 cases, unfair competition, unjust enrichment, unauthorized use of name and likeness and interference with economic advantage” in July of 1979. The suit additionally accused Waters of producing the bootlegs Fire, “E” Ticket and Cheap Trick’s California Man 78

While Vicky Vinyl/Andrea Waters “had no time for Springsteen’s music” to quote Heylin and these box sets were just a means for her to finance more Rolling Stones releases, things were quite different for Jim Washburn, the store manager of Beggar’s Banquet – her Anaheim record store. He was a Springsteen fan and had been with Lou Cohen when Springsteen was presented with a copy of THE JERSEY DEVIL after the Santa Barbara gym concert on 1 November 1975, observing ‘The Boss’ enthusiastic reaction to having been bootlegged for the first time.

Washburn: “Throughout the course of the [1979] lawsuit, I couldn’t believe that Springsteen was behind it. He must be uninformed, this guy who was going on stage and talking … about how lawyers shouldn’t run the world. I wrote him a letter – wrapped in a rare Ronettes picture sleeve – in which I asked to meet with him, and if he still thought I’d wronged him after explaining our side, I offered to do anything I could to make it up to him. I delivered it to the desk of the Sunset Marquis in Hollywood when he was staying there, and it was promptly turned over to his attorneys, who were not terribly nice about it. Having slept on sidewalks to get Springsteen tickets and all that … I still couldn’t believe Mr. Populist Rocker had gone corporate. As the suit was winding to a close, Springsteen was again in town for a series of concerts [Springsteen played four shows at the L.A. Sports Arena, 30 October to 3 November 1980 ]. I spent all the money I had getting a room at the Sunset Marquis in the hopes of talking to him. Which I did when he showed up poolside, and he made it clear that that’s what he had lawyers for, and to leave him alone.” [Heylin, E Street Shuffle: The Glory Days of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band]

In 1981, finally nailed down on the issue in an interview by Creem magazine, Springsteen said:

“Dave Dimartino: Why did you change your opinion about bootlegs?

Bruce Springsteen: I felt that there was a point there where, when it first started, a lot of bootlegs were made by fans, there was more of a connection. But it became, there was a point where there were just so many. Just so many that it was big business. It was made by people who, you know, they didn’t care what the quality was. It just got to the point where I’d walk in and see a price tag of $30 on a record of mine that, to me, really sounded bad, and I just thought it was a rip. I thought I was getting ripped, I wrote the music, the songs – it all came out of me! And I felt it was a rip, and the people who were doing it had warehouses full of records and were just sitting back, getting fat, rushing and putting out anything and getting 30 fucking dollars for it. And I just got really mad about it at one point. “

In the end – December 1980, Waters pleaded guilty to one count of copyright infringement and was fined $5,000 for that. Awarded to Springsteen in the civil suit were 43 times $50,000 for each violated music copyright, adding up to $2,150,000 and CBS received $1,500 and court costs of $105,573. However, neither party could collect on the judgement as Waters and Washburn had already declared bankruptcy, aided by the relatively long time span between the FBI bust and CBS’ filing their civil suit for damages.

As described in Heylin’s BOOTLEG book, the FBI had had been given Water’s name several months prior already, when a Canadian retailer, Michael Mess decided to name her, Ken, Kurt Glemser and John Wizardo as the real people behind “a Long Beach bootleg ring”. A Malcolm Moore was identified as responsible for pressing the K&S titles. On 22 February 1980, the FBI and RCMP raided 150 people in the same day, from Georgia to California to Ontario, Canada, trying one and for all to stamp out this bootleg business. While some players were stopped, we know today that it did little to stem the tide. As Heylin puts it: “… the FBI failed to severe the cord between manufacturer and punter.”, and producers abroad, especially Europe and Japan were just getting started. However the bust of 1980 wiped out most of the second generation labels/producers, with the exception of Ken, who had moved to Spain by that time.

HW 7 police stamp

Canadian police evidence number stamp applied following the raid and confiscation at the Hot Wacks Press office in 1980. Item later purchased from Kurt Glemser after he received it all back.

Jim Washburn later pointed out in OC Weekly that, “despite the headlines about the $2.1 million ruling, the glut of other bootleggers’ Bruce boots was just beginning.”

****

I was sent this list for the UL, dated May 1980 and the question is, could Andrea ‘Enthal’ be an alias used by Vicky Vinyl?

 

Andrea letter

19 October 1976: The Sound Recording Amendment to U.S. copyright law for the first time extends copyright protection to sound recordings. Unfortunately, it combines both counterfeit and ‘pirate’ recordings in the same category as “misappropriated” recordings, “making bootlegs the legal equivalent of any pirate album containing commercially released material in alternative packaging” (Heylin, BOOTLEG, p. 125). In addition, for the first time the owner of any exclusive right (for example, mechanical reproduction) can now claim action for infringement. This right previously lay with the copyright owner of a work exclusively. As a result, record companies could now instigate legal proceedings without the cooperation of the artist.

“Vicki Vinyl was busted, a guy who was distributing Wizardo Records was busted, a number of stores were busted, my friend back east was busted – he was sending me the King Kong and Contraband Records in trade for my records. There were a whole bunch of people busted in December 1976.” [Lou Cohan in Heylin, BOOTLEG, p. 125]

The FBI, however had a lot to learn and were operating on some false beliefs, for example that there was a ‘Mr. Big’ somewhere behind this, controlling it all and in return for talking deals were offered.

“Wizardo, now working in tandem with Vicki Vinyl, managed to wriggle out of a first rap with a little kiss’n’tell. He promptly started up again, assigning new releases to the 500 series, only to be hit a second time. This time operations were forcibly put on hold by court action. Cohan, who was also busted at the end of 1976, was lucky that the FBI did not manage to gather all the available evidence.” (Heylin, BOOTLEG, p. 126)

As Lou Cohen was a volume dealer with an impressive catalog with product sourced from other bootleggers the FBI thought that this was their “Mr. Big”: “As for my own personal bootlegs, the most I ever pressed was 4,000 of any one title, the average was around 2,500 … [but] I would trade my bootlegs with other bootleggers, including a guy on the East Coast [in Darby, PA], so that by the time the FBI busted me in December of 1976 … I carried hundreds of titles, but only about twelve to ffteen of my own. I only made, I think twenty-two bootlegs. Hot Wacks says I made about ten, because I changed label titles, I changed what was scratched in the vinyl, to try and confuse the FBI.” [Lou Cohan in Heylin, BOOTLEG, p. 127]

While Wizardo’s second bust forced him to appear in court and close up shop for good, Cohan paid $1,000 to a lawyer, who made the whole issue disappear. Cohan retired his label name Hoffman Avenue Records and started up again using a pressing plant not listed as such in the yellow pages and continued until the end of 1977.

If anyone deserved the title “Mr. Big”, it was certainly Ken but Ken was never caught. Heylin’s book has ‘Eric Bristow’ recount an anecdote when the California State Police almost busted Ken in Westminster in Orange County, CA when a neighbor called the cops on him claiming Ken dealt in stolen property. Incredibly, Ken managed the cops to only leave with some samples and his lawyer basically blackmailed the police into dropping the case for not arresting Ken on the spot! To the best of my knowledge, a couple of the raided samples are the only items ever to come up for public auction:

 

Dylan CotH police evidence 1

Dylan CotH police evidence 2

Dylan CotH police evidence detail

From the auction description:

“Dylan Police Evidence
Police Evidence Sticker on Back Sleeve
Spine Also has 3 White Labels on It with Bob Dylans Name, LP Name & Cat #

TMOQ Record was A Legendary Bootleg Label Based In Westminster California back in the 70’s
Then when One day the Westminster Police Dept. Shut them down and this is one of the records that
was seized and held as evidence with the label from the police stamped and labeled.

If you check Popsike.com Under “TMOQ Evidence Room” you will also find
some Labels from this same seize and that has the same label from the Westminster
Police with Stamp & Lot #. Which Sold for $577

Labels evidence

Pink Floyd Eclipsed XLPink Floyd Eclipsed 2Pink Floyd Eclipsed disc 2Pink Floyd Eclipsed disc 1

Matrix: 404 A – D

My friend and main go-to person for bootleg research pointed out that this number looked like the 4xx series the 70s GLC label was using (GLC 411: Rolling Stones – All Meat Music ?; GLC 412: Neil Young – Young & Old; GLC 413: Elton John – B-B-B-Benny – Live in London; GLC 415: Crosby Stills Nash and Young “we waited 3 years for this”).

Sides A+B live at the London Rainbow on 20 February 1972 and sides C+D BBC Paris Theater 30 September 1971

floydboots.com states that the above was the first issue of this double LP with just 200 copies made on orange and light blue PVC, however not everyone agrees, see the list below.

A Vicki Vinyl/Ken co-production? The sub title hints that this might be a new pressing of TAKRL’s 1903 IN CELEBRATION OF THE COMET master, which was a copy of the German bootleg Best Of Tour 72

Pink Floyd best of Tour 72 combi

It should be noted that reissues of the TAKRL release and ECLIPSED both exist with Dessie Records and Verzyl paper labels. Two of the three tracks on the second disc had previously been available on yet another early TAKRL release: # 1913: NOCTURNAL SUBMISSION : ROBOT LOVE but Hot Wacks claims this was a copy of Contraband’s Floyds Of London

Pink Floyd Floyds of London v1 3

floydboots states that this does exist with a deluxe cover in a rare variation. If anyone has a good image of this, do leave a comment. The matrix number changed later to ECL 1-4:

Pink Floyd Eclipsed gre blu

I found the following list during my research but it clearly has to be taken with a pinch of salt. Unless you were there or one of the associates kept notes and they are available, it is very hard to say. which insert color was the genuine first issue.

1) 404 A-D. First pressing, big yellow insert cover, original yellow/white “Ruthless Rhymes” labels.

2) 404 A-D. First pressing, green (record 1) & blue (record 2) vinyl, 100 made, big red insert cover with stamp imprint, original yellow/white “Ruthless Rhymes” labels.

3) 404 A-D. First pressing, blue (record 1) and orange (record 2) vinyl, 200 made, big red insert cover with stamp imprint, original yellow/white “Ruthless Rhymes” labels.

4) 404 A-D. First pressing, big white/brown insert cover, record 1 with white label, record 2 with green label.

Pink Floyd Eclipsed whi

5) ECL 1-4. Second pressing, little yellow insert cover, white label.

6) ECL 1-4. Multicoloured vinyl, 50 made, little yellow insert cover with sticker, black/white cartoon labels. This also exists on black PVC.

Pink Floyd EclipsedPink Floyd Eclipsed blPink Floyd Eclipsed dark

7) RUTHLESS RHYMES GLC 404 A-D. Third pressing, green/blue vinyl, 100 numbered edition, big brown insert cover, silver/red “GLC” labels.

8) RUTHLESS RHYMES GLC 404 A-D. “Raring Record” labels.

9) LXXXIV Series #54, reissue of the “Ruthless Rhymes” edition, green/blue vinyl, 100 numbered edition copies.

***

Missing from the above list are pressings made with Slipped Disc, yellow RECORD 1/2 and Dessie Records labels – “RE-ISSUED AGAIN ON THE ‘DESSIE RECORDS’ LABEL USING NEW PLATES (MATRIX NUMBER – DESSIE A/D GR L-29708).”:

Pink Floyd Eclipsed SD

Pink Floyd Eclipsed yel lblPink Floyd Eclipsed Dessie

***

Auction results for this title vary quite a bit, with the colored Ruthless Rhymes and LXXXIV versions selling for as much as $500 and the MCV/Verzyl versions even close to $1200 but all other versions hovering around the $50+ mark.

This release has been copied in Europe several times with deluxe covers (copying the tree lady art work on the back) and box sets referred to by a color.

****

Jimi Hendrix ‘BROADCASTS – Maui

Hendrix Broadcasts Maui red blu

Reissue of this classic TMoQ combo 7502 and about the third incarnation and also the third on colored wax. Also exists in red & green and with blank labels.

***

ditto ‘LIVE AT THE L.A. FORUM 4-26-70‘ “SCUSE ME…” version

Hendrix Live LA Forum blu gree

Back in the day, many bootleggers issued this title, Rubber Dubber, Munia, TMoQ, … it was even available as a series of four 7″ records. The insert originally showed an image of Jimi’s head but a dark spot appeared on the Hen and TMOQ versions and more rounds of copying the copy transformed it into something looking like an expressionist art piece.

 

Hendrix Live LA Forum clear insertHendrix Live LA Forum mcvThe splatter/mcv discs are usually found with Mushroom label designated packages but not in this case.

Hendrix LatLAFo mcv 2

***

Jethro Tull ‘MESS

Jethro Tull Flute Cake mcvJethro Tull MessTwo different reissues of this early TMoQ title recorded by Dub Taylor shortly after Led Zeppelin’s Blueberry Hill performance.

****

ROLLING STONES ‘(in exotic) “HONOLULU“‘

Rolling Stones Honolulu RR lblRolling Stones Honolulu cvRolling Stones Honolulu cv 2

A reissue of Pig’s Eye # 09

***

ditto ‘SUMMER RERUNS’

Rolling Stones Summer Reruns red blu RRRolling Stones Summer Reruns red blu RR 1Rolling Stones Summer Reruns red blu RR 2

Rolling Stones Summer Reruns red blu RR CECV

Originally out as TMoQ 72011

***

Frank Zappa ‘METAL MAN HAS HORNETS WINGS’

Originally on Wizardo Records – WRMB 365

Zappa MMHHW yellowZappa MMHHW yellow 2

****

And two example of stamps with different fonts (the second example may not even be a stamp and may have been produced significantly later):

Dylan LMDIMFS

Zappa 200 Motels stamp

****

I’m probably missing a few. If you know of any others, do leave a comment.

Genesis LftMotMonsterGenesis LftMotM bAlso exists with blank and red labels or with a blue tinted cover and the “Atlantis Records” labels (made up to go with the back cover logo) seen here:

Genesis LftMotM blu

And as part of the ‘MULTI COLOURED VINYL’ sticker series:

Genesis LftMotMonster

Genesis LftMotMonster disc 1Genesis LftMotMonster disc 2

When Genesis revisited Chicago on their extended “…And Then There Were Three” Tour, it was decided to play at a smaller venue with better acoustics and the Uptown Theatre was chosen. Local radio station WXRT received permission to record the show for broadcast, one of only three radio recordings made during this tour.

Complete set list:

01 Crowd Noise
00:49
02 Eleventh Earl Of Mar
09:07
03 In The Cage
08:15
04 Burning Rope
08:20
05 Dancing With The Moonlit Knight
05:06
06 The Musical Box (Closing Section)
03:52
07 Ripples
10:23
08 Deep In The Motherlode
07:26
09 One For The Vine
10:52
10 Squonk
06:44
11 Say It’s Alright Joe
10:02
12 The Lady Lies
07:16
13 Romeo & Juliet Story
04:01
14 The Cinema Show / … In That Quiet Earth
11:26
15 Afterglow
04:56
16 Follow You, Follow Me
04:32
17 Dance On A Volcano
04:15
18 Drum Duet
01:30
19 Los Endos
06:35
20 I Know What I Like
09:12
21 After Show Interview With Phil
07:36

***

“The Uptown had been showing second-run movies when Jam began booking rock shows there. The list of performers is impressive: The Grateful Dead for six three-night stands between 1978 and 1981; Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band for three shows in 1978 and 1980; Bob Marley and the Wailers for dates in […] 1978 and 1979; Frank Zappa for four visits (and five shows) between 1977 and 1981; Cheap Trick opening for the Kinks in 1977; Genesis and Peter Gabriel playing six days apart in October 1978; and Prince opening for Rick James in early 1980 and headlining later that year.

Even now, one of the well-worn seat backs in the dusty auditorium boasts a Grateful Dead bumper sticker that reads, “Warning, I Brake for Hallucinations.” In the oval ladies lounge, these words remain scrawled: “Springsteen is God.”

Uptown_seat_backs

But the rock bookings and movie screenings couldn’t keep the theater — owned by the Plitt movie theater chain and, for much of Jam’s time there, a local theater operator named Rene Rabiela — from falling into disrepair and eventual insolvency. The heat was shut off, and in winter 1982 the pipes burst, flooding the basement and causing extensive damage to ceilings, walls and staircases that has yet to be repaired.” [Chicago Tribune, October 11, 2011]

****

This Slipped Disc bootleg seems to be the only vinyl bootleg pressed from an Uptown Theater performance but it certainly helped establish a place in bootleg history for this grand old theater.

Other recordings made at the Uptown:

– HAWKWIND – Uptown Theater,Chicago,Il. November 26,1973 incomplete aud. recording Vg+

– MARSHALL TUCKER BAND – May 5 1977 Uptown Theater Chicago (FM)

Uptown MTB

– GRATEFUL DEAD – Feb 1, 1978 ***SOUNDBOARD***

– GRATEFUL DEAD – 1978-05-16&17

– BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN –  September 6, 1978

– FRANK ZAPPA—– SEPTEMBER 29th 1978

– GRATEFUL DEAD – November 18, 1978   * SBD *

– BOB MARLEY & THE WAILERS – 1979-11-13  VIDEO

– GRATEFUL DEAD 1979-12-03/04/05  [SBD]

– BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN 1980-10-11

– KANSAS – 1980-10-28 *FM* [1 song has now seen an official release]

– FRANK ZAPPA—– NOVEMBER 28 + 29TH 1980

– GRATEFUL DEAD –  2-26/27/28-81

– JERRY GARCIA BAND 1981-11-17  Early and Late Show

***

Concerts at the Uptown:

Hawkwind – 26 November1973

The Tubes – 31 October 1975

Bay City Rollers – 27 August 1976                               Concert announcement in the Daily Herald from that day:

BCR UptownImages here: http://uptownhistory.compassrose.org/2011/05/1976-bay-city-rollers-concert-uptown.html

BCR Uptown

Bay City Rollers at the Uptown Theathre August 27, 1976.

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Boston w. Jim Peterik – 3 October 1976

The Kinks w. Cheap Trick – 12 February 1977
Kinks Uptown
ELO w. Steve Hillage – 26, 27, 28 February 1977

ELO Uptown

Peter Gabriel – 11 March 1977

Utopia – 18 March 1977

Procol Harum – 1 May 1977

Marshall Tucker Band – 5 May 1977

Foreigner – 14 May 1977

Foreigner – 30 September 1977

Thin Lizzy – 5 November 1977   http://www.thinlizzyguide.com/tours/dates/1977/771105.htm

Gentle Giant – 20 November 1977

The Ramones – 20 January 1978

Grateful Dead – 30, 31 January + 1 February 1978

Grateful Dead – 17 May 1978

Bob Marley & The Wailers – 27 May 1978

Marley B Uptown T 78

Photo taken by Paul Natkin for the Chicago Tribune

Bruce Springsteen – 6 September 1978

Frank Zappa – 29 September 1978

Zappa Uptown

Genesis – 13, 14 October 1978

Genesis Chicago 13.10.78

Peter Gabriel – 19 October 1978 [the 14 December ’78 edition of Rolling Stone ran a concert review of the Genesis & Peter Gabriel shows at the Uptown]

RS-review-Dec-78

Grateful Dead – 16-18 November 1978
GDead Uptown 78 stub

Utopia – 5 January 1979

Roxy Music – 6 April 1979

The Allman Brothers Band – 23, 24 May 1979

Bob Marley & The Wailers – 13 November 1979

Grateful Dead – 3-5 December 1979

Rick James w. Prince – 28, 29 February 1980

Peter Gabriel – 26 June 1980

“I was a high school senior in June of 1980. Tom, Dave, and I had scored tickets to see Peter Gabriel at the Uptown Theater. This was the “Melt” tour; the show  would feature the recently released third solo album.

We arrived at the Uptown Theater and climbed a wide, carpeted staircase to reach our first row, first balcony seats. At the far end of the first balcony lobby was a small bar tended by a waiter with a vest and bow tie. Deciding to take the risk, I approached and ordered three beers. The beers were poured. I paid. I brought them to our seats. I repeated this process several times. We were ecstatic: Uptown Theater, first row, first balcony, bouncing beers and waiting to see Peter Gabriel.

So I’m in the aisle seat. The house lights go off and there’s that magical anticipation: nothing but the red lights on the amps shining into the darkness.

At this point, a strange character walks down the balcony stairs and stands right next to me. His head is shaved, completely bald. He’s wearing a dark blue sweatsuit with white stripes down each sleeve. I remember thinking, Peter Gabriel can bring out some weird dudes. Then out of nowhere comes an incredibly bright blast of light. I look to my left, and this bald guy is waving a massive hand-held spotlight. He’s spraying the theater with this light. Almost immediately, I noticed other people throughout the theater dressed in the same sweatsuits doing the same with their spotlights.

I turn back to my left to take a closer look at this bald guy. He looks directly at me. He points the beam upward to illuminate his face.

It’s Peter Gabriel.

I leap out of my seat. “It’s Peter Gabriel! You’re Peter Gabriel!” I’m grabbing for Dave and Tom jumping up and down and then I put each one of my hands on each one of Peter Gabriel’s shoulders. The only thing I can say is, “You’re Peter Gabriel! You’re Peter Gabriel!” over and over. He stares at me, expressionless, then slowly, deliberately, starts walking backward out of my reach and back up the balcony stairs.

Meanwhile, all the other beams are making their way to the stage. It’s the band; each member has been positioned around the theater.

The show was fantastic. This was the first tour that included “Biko,” the entire theater was bellowing out the chorus to the song. I remember reading a later quote from Peter Gabriel saying that the Uptown Theater reaction to Biko had brought tears to his eyes.” [by Mike Landreth]

Grateful Dead – 19-21 August 1980

The Kinks w. Angel City – 17 September 1980

Bruce Springsteen – 10, 11 October 1980

Kansas – 28, 29 October 1980

Frank Zappa – 28, 29 November 1980

Prince – 26 December 1980

1980-12-19 Prince

Elvis Costello & The Attractions – 17 January 1981

Grateful Dead – 26-28 February 1981

Alice Cooper – 5 August 1981

Jerry Garcia Band – 17 November 1981

Frank Zappa – 27 November 1981

1981-11-27 Frank Zappa Chicago

J. Geils Band w. Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes – 19 December 1981

uptown-theatre-wide

LIVE AT HAMMERSMITH ODEON

Springsteen atHammersmith

A) Ruthless Rhymes labels. Orange/Blue/Yellow insert. Matrix BS 1975 (same for all versions)
B) Slipped disc labels. Various insert colors
C) Blue blank labels. Deep Yellow/Orange inserts
E) Raring Records label – first time with wrap-around insert ca. 1981                                                                 D) Smoking Pig labels with wrap-around insert

The bootleg section of brucespringsteen.it reports that the inserts used for C) & E) show signs of having been copied (I will spare you the discussion of shadows between monkey legs… ). More importantly, two types of inserts exist: The standard single sheet version and a slightly re-designed wrap around version with a Bruce-Landau meeting story on the flip side, reminiscent of of a lot of Vicky Vinyl product 1976-77 (see below):

Springsteen Hammersmith Odeon it

This live recording from 18 November 1975 has since been officially released in 2005 on the Born To Run: 30th Anniversary 3-Disc Set .

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“E” Ticket

Springsteen E Ticket 6

Springsteen E Ticket

Springsteen E Ticket bBack of the LP track listing, obviously not written by a German native speaker

Springsteen E Ticket b2The number shown on the top right hand corner of the LP is identical with the matrix number. Also available with blank white and green “hörweite stereophonie” labels, as expected.

Side 1:

Rosalita (Come out tonight)      New York,NY,914 Studios(USA) 01-Jul-1973/1        Instrumental  
Kitty’s back                                                                                                    ”                            –         
Thunder road                               New York,NY,Record Plant(USA) 01-Mar-1975/1        –       
4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy) New York,NY,914 Studios(USA) 01-Jul-1973/1     Instrumental

Side 2:
Walking in the streets          New York,NY,Record Plant(USA) 01-Mar-1975/1                     –   
She’s the one                                                                                                ”                                    –   
A love so fine              New York,NY,????(USA) 16-Oct-1974/1                                        Instrumental
Born to run                  New York,NY,914 Studios(USA) 01-Aug-1974/1                                    – 
Thunder road              New York,NY,Record Plant(USA) 01-Mar-1975/1                       Acoustic  
Jungleland                                                                                           ”                                   ending w. chorus

***

Then there were two advance copy versions that might not actually be genuine – confirmation needed:

Springsteen E Ticket adv

“A blank-cover pre-release is rumored to exist, and it should be a white stamped and hand numbered white sleeve with the same matrix and labels. It’s unclear the role of the so-called ‘advance pressing’ stamped cover edition with custom green labels(ST/MX1), since this circulated massively and at low cost in late ’80, and it seems a modern reprint, carrying an evident reprint of the ‘head’ variant of the label.” [brucespringsteen.it, from where I also borrowed a few images]

Springsteen E Ticket adv.png 2

In the 1980’s also reissued as a picture disc.

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The book Warman’s American Records includes a picture of this bootleg with the caption “Bruce Springsteen was very upset when he saw this album “E Ticket”, available in independent record stores – with early rough mixes of songs from his Born To Run album.

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BORN TO ROCK

Springsteen Born T RkSpringsteen Born T Rk bObviously not a genuine Ruthless Rhymes product. Also found with “Guilty” labels (another clue) and usually on black PVC.

Tower Theatre, Philadelphia (Upper Darby), PA, USA – December 31, 1975

“This show was the last of a four-night stand (27, 28, 30, 31 December) at the Tower Theatre. Recent events had given Springsteen much publicity and a national profile. Ninety thousand people consequently applied for tickets to see him at this three thousand seat venue. The first thirteen of the eighteen songs played appeared on the double LP Born To Rock (Ruthless Rhymes).

Mike Appel, Springsteen’s then manager, wanted to capitalise on the success of Born To Run with a double or triple LP of live performances. Accordingly, the Tower Theatre shows were recorded, along with concerts in Greenvale, NY (12 December) and Toronto, Canada (21 December), using the Record Plant’s mobile unit with Jimmy Iovine responsible for the recording. Songs from the now-legendary shows at the Bottom Line and the Roxy Theatre earlier in the year were also under consideration for the album. A live album would have been a good idea. Springsteen had already built up a formidable reputation as a live performer, enhanced by radio broadcasts of live shows and cemented by the production of bootlegs of these performances. In particular, Springsteen fan Lou Cohan had produced LPs of the Bottom Line and Roxy shows. As Clinton Heylin writes in his bootleg history, The Great White Wonders, this “was clearly one instance where bootlegs were helping to establish an artist rather than riding on the back of his success.” A live album would also presumably have been much quicker to produce, avoiding the excruciatingly prolonged process that had finally resulted in Born To Run, and getting another album into the record shops while interest in Springsteen was still considerable.

The reason that this live album failed to appear is bound up with the power struggle between Appel and Springsteen’s future manager, Jon Landau. According to Dave Marsh, in his book Born To Run, Springsteen “felt that the band’s onstage excitement wasn’t ready to be captured yet.” Marc Eliot’s The Making Of Bruce Springsteen tells a different story, suggesting that Springsteen initially favoured a live release but was dissuaded by Landau. Landau had been brought in to co-produce Born To Run. He had not only handled production duties but had done much to sort out the impasse and get the album released. Appel, seemingly wary of Landau’s influence, told Landau that he would, of course, work on the next studio album, but that he would not be required for the live LP. In a seeming attempt to marginalise Landau, Appel also pointed out to Springsteen that “it would be foolish to have Jon Landau as a producer of a live album where he had no experience.” As is well known, Landau supplanted Appel as Springsteen’s manager and no live album appeared.” [collectorsmusicreview.com]

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SMALL TOWN BOY

Springsteen ST Boy bSpringsteen ST BoyMatrix: 24473

The back cover mentions ‘Contessa Records’, so this was clearly produced by someone else. Later repressed and now more commonly known as the Swingin’Pig release under the same title from the second half of the 1980s.