DEEP PUPLE ‘CALIFORNIA JAM / PERKS AND TIT’ UD-6555/6

Deep Purple California Jam

Deep Purple California Jam b

Japan: 1981

 

 

The only previous (bootleg) release of Deep Purple’s appearance at the California Jam Festival in 1974 had been the inclusion of one song – “Space Trucking” – on the first release on Contraband’s King Kong sub label, 1974/5 (KK001-A/B):

VA California Jammin 2

 

“Lenny Stogel, former Music manager & ABC Television executive
Sandy Feldman decided to sponsor two huge outdoor Rock n Roll
Festivals, one in 1974 and the next in 1978 and both Festivals were
held at Ontario Motor Speedway, Ontario, California just outside
of Los Angeles. The Festivals became known as CAL JAM and
CAL JAM II. Both Festivals were Televised on ABC Television on
its “In Concert” series. CAL JAM I in 1974 generated the largest gross income of its time $2,000,000 and drew in 200,000 fans.”

“Most of this concert was broadcast over 4 weekends in April 1974 on KLOS-FM ABC-TV Stereo Simulcast, along with other California Jam artists.” [wikipedia]

The first official release of this performance was on video in several countries from 1981 onward.

Deep Purple Cali Jam VHS

 

The California Jam part of the UD bootleg featured the missing track “Lay Down Stay Down” for the first time, which was not included on any of the later official releases until the remastered version of the official California Jamming CD in 2003. As the complete concert runs over 80 minutes, I suspect that UD made some cuts, most probably in the originally 25 minutes long “Space Trucking”. They also did some reshuffling, as the show started with “Burn”. 

6555 A: Space Trucking / Burn / Might Just Take Your Life / Lay Down Stay Down
6555 B: Smoke On The Water / Mistreated / Space Trucking (Reprise)

 ***

The California Jam material was bootlegged on vinyl at least one more time on this four track LP (H-300 A/B) on the European Laughing Clown label, ca. 1983, most likely taken from the video soundtrack (I am not sure I trust the source description given on the back and this label appears to have had a tendency to utilize available video soundtracks).

Deep Purple Flasback

Deep Purple Flasback b

**

Deep Purple Cali Jam fire

Ritchie playing with fire “The fire Marshall said it’s OK – really”

***

The second disc featured a copy of the TAKRL bootleg PERKS AND TIT (1930 A/B), featuring four tracks from the final show on the U.S. leg of the tour ‘three days after’ but also repeating “Smoke On The Water” from California Jam. Still, it makes a nice companion piece and shows an above average effort by UD.

Dep Purple Perks & Tit detail

This double LP appeared more frequently in past eBay auctions than other UD titles. A recently recorded auction in August of 2014 ended at $100.

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2 comments
  1. Erik T said:

    Anyone else wonder what’s up with these Japanese boots attributing Japanese concerts to English performances? We’re recordings of foreign performances still not (as) protected in Japan in the early 80’s? Were the manufacturers exporting a lot of these to England? Just curious…
    Saw a few cheap boots at a record show last weekend, but I used to see more. A sealed Ian Hunter, a British-looking Crosby/Nash and a Tubes one. No takers even at the end of the day. No new product either, but there were some at another show a few weeks ago. The classic rock boots from the old days are usually crappy WCF types, of now- obsolete material like Who outtakes or Stones film soundtracks.
    Didn’t Deep Purple release Perks and Tit themselves? I think KBFH released the whole 77 show as part of a series of King Biscuit material, in the 90s, I almost bought it myself but the final gasps of Deep Purple weren’t great in my opinion. I am surprised nobody in Japan bootlegged the 72 Copenhagen tv broadcast soundtrack, given it was rarer then than the California Jam material was by the 80s ok I am getting too carried away here…

  2. Hi Erik, I mentioned it several times now: It was a response to Japan signing the treaty to protect copyrights for records in 1978, which made bootlegs recorded in Japan illegal. The finer legal points of this still elude me, in regards why it was OK to release bootlegs recorded in other countries.

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